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Here is a link to a video of top notch border collies working cattle in a large open field:

 

 

From a newbie:

 

Do cattle always kick this much, or was it because it was their first time being worked by dogs? And taking on that bull! Impressive!

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Thanks for posting this =] My grandfather used to work cattle with 2 border collies and a bulldog. One BC lost a leg after being attacked by a bull, but went back to work shortly after it was amputated. He also used them to hunt bears - talk about a tough three legged dog!

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Cattle kick. A smart dog learns to grip the heel that's on the ground, not the one that's "free to kick". And he/she learns to grip low, not high. Both of these lessons learned will reduce the chance of the dog being kicked tremendously. Plus, cattle can kick straight back and out to the side, as you can see in the video.

 

Our cattle are quite docile. Celt, who is not a strong dog but one with good stock-reading instincts, can do most anything we need here. What he lacks in push, he makes up in being willing to give it another try. Plus, with cattle like ours, it's not really a matter of gripping, it's a matter of quiet determination - which would not work with wilder cattle or cattle that are not dog-broke.

 

Dan, on the other hand, has recently been dubbed the Intercowtinental Ballistic Missle. Our stock are very much aware that this is a dog of a different nature, and you can see it in their reaction to him. Once he's trained reasonably well, I doubt there'd be anything here he could not accomplish, and he will have the push that Celt tends to lack.

 

I liked the part about having to dog-break cattle. That is essential. Good dog-breaking makes the whole stockworking process go well, reduces stress, and makes it better all around. Too many people want to work cattle with a dog when the cattle haven't been broken to dog-work, and that's often not going to work out well for either cattle or dog.

 

JMO, from a very limited point of view.

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OMG! That's the guy who was running a sheep workshop I went to one day at a local dog facility.

 

The receptionist had told me, before I spent $95, that this herding workshop would be the ideal atmosphere in which I could check Buddy's herding instincts. Ended up being not true AT ALL: we stuck out like sore thumbs, and went home shamefacedly. ::Sigh::

 

I'm sure the man is a great trainer. Just a poor experience with bad communication from the facility.

 

Mary

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