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Moss's progress- on video!


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I was able to bring my (crappy) video camera out to Dianne's today and managed to get some decent footage of the Moss Man when she worked him :D

 

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He's only been in training for 5 days, but is doing pretty awesome. He's still a puppy in a lot of ways (just 10 months old), but he's so natural and biddable, he makes it look easy! Dianne told me that in a couple months, I'm going to have to pry him out of her hands :rolleyes:

 

I'm so excited!

 

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I thought a lot like you did, Betty - he seems quite sensible and learning fast! You are fortunate (and wise) to have him started by someone capable like Dianne.

 

My Dan is also 10 months old (soon) but I'm afraid he'll be an unguided missle his first time on sheep, which will be coming up within the next month. I doubt I'll have such nice video to share!

 

Keep us posted!

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Moss is looking good!

My Dan is also 10 months old (soon) but I'm afraid he'll be an unguided missle his first time on sheep,

I think Dan will be more like a heat-seeking missile, going for those noses and heels!

A

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Moss is looking good!

 

I think Dan will be more like a heat-seeking missile, going for those noses and heels!

A

Maybe he'll be a feet-seeking missle! I await the big day with excitement and trepidation, and hope he shows some of the nice work (at least when he's had a chance to progress a bit) that Moss is showing.

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Narita - You seem to bring this up over and over again, and appear to be in a difficult situation. You have some sheep and a pen, do not feel you can access/afford competent training assistance, and have issues with "wild" behavior in one or more of your dogs and your sheep. You express the desire (or need) to do it yourself.

 

With the issues you have and the contraints you have, perhaps the best thing to do would be to realize that you are in no position to be attempting training your dogs on stock right now. It doesn't seem fair (IMO) to either the dogs or the stock, from the descriptions you have posted here and elsewhere of the problems you are experiencing.

 

Julie P suggested in another thread that since there is a possibility of a trainer an hour away, that rather than keeping sheep and the accompanying expense, you might take the resources you are putting into the sheep and put them into real training at that location (or elsewhere). Have you considered that?

 

You often post about your issues but I just don't see where any advice that people offer to really help you is being used. It certainly must be frustrating to not be able to get competent, consistent help in training your dogs but, since that seems to be your situation, maybe it would be doing your dogs and your sheep a favor to not try going it alone without reasonable success, and stop and wait (and save) until you are able to get some real help.

 

I've followed your posts with concern and interest, and have tried to not say anything offensive, but I think you need to really assess your situation from a less emotionally-involved perspective, and do what's best for the dogs and sheep right now in the situation you are in.

 

Best wishes.

 

PS - While the philosophy of these boards is that breeding Border Collies must be based on working ability, you might also consider that that is just as valid an approach for breeding Australian Shepherds, a breed with a history of being a very useful stock and farm dog that has largely become a breed bred for other reasons. I wonder about the comment concerning offering stud service or a puppy to a trainer in exchange for instruction. What reputable trainer would want stud service or a pup from unproven parentage? Please, don't be offended, but think about it.

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Hi Narita

 

If you would like to chat on the phone, PM me, and we can talk. I would like to try and help, though I am certainly no expert, I have a modicum of knowledge, in that I know what NOT to do :rolleyes:

 

As to your dogs, I would say that you need to either send your dog out for training (which I, and Moss's owner have done). It's a good idea for super keen, pushy, wild, you name it dogs, that may not be that easy to train for you, but for a trainer, much easier. I wanted to start my Danny as well, but he needed daily exposure to sheep, and he could not get that.

 

Some dogs are harder than nuts to crack (get in their heads) and some just seem that way. I can tell you it is very frustrating to a dog to always have bad experiences with sheep. To always get told off, or pushed off. It builds tension, and then you have to take a lot of time to remove the tension.

 

Gripping is most often a sign of a dog who is in over his head, in my experience. If you have a dog who grips badly, you NEED a professional trainer to deal with that, or he will never be rehabilitated.

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