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Anyone ever teach commands in another language?

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I taught Tobey and Izzy to sit in Finnish today. I was inspired by a relative's friend who is K-9 police officer and their GSD's are trained in Turkish. It's fun and they learned it very quickly...not surprising for a BC of course!

 

Tim

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Jin speaks some spanish. But I don't really see a difference in his performance.

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In high school I house sat for a family and the husbands hunting dog was trained in german. While he was perfect for the family who had learned to pronounce everything correctly, it was a little more challenging for me for the first few days. Luckily the dog was a pretty good boy and luckily one of my sisters took german in college so she was able to help me. I've never really thought it should matter what language you use w/ dogs, after all the are going off of the sound, not the meaning of the word. I can't stand it when people in agility get all hung up on lefts and rights; I've heard more arguments between people when the use the word for the opposite direction, as long as you are consistent, it shouldn't matter whether you're saying words or grunts.

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I agree it doesn't matter at all. They know sit in english and a hand signal. One shouldn't get hung up, and the dog doesn't know the difference. I can see why a K-9 officer would use a foreign language though.

 

Tim

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My dog is fluent in Romanian and English. He knows all his commands and also many names of his toys in both languages. Some toys have only Romanian or only English names - especially if they're the same "breed", so we can distinguish between them.

 

It does become confusing if the same word (sound) has different meanings in the two languages. Such as "touch" and "taci" (shut up).

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Growing up, all family dogs, all the dogs of friends of the family (family and friends were from Europe & Russia) were bilingual. English/Russian. English/German and no one blinked an eye. In fact, come to think of it, the dogs were a lot like us kids who were bi & tri lingual. It was a natural outcome of our circumstances.

 

When my aunt retired, I got her a little keeshond bitch who knew nothing but English. It wasn't long before the dog became bilingual.

 

No raised eyebrows here at a dog's ability to understand two languages.

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My daughter who is fascinated by the Japanese culture is teaching all her commands for agility in japanese

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I've been teaching the dogs some commands in portuguese (brazilian) just for fun because my hubby is from Brazil and I'm trying to learn the language myself.

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Does anyone speak in tongues to their dogs on the trial field,m or in training?

I'm convinced this should work well, as it is the language of the Holy Spirit, and is the official language of the angels , according to scripture.

 

 

 

I taught Tobey and Izzy to sit in Finnish today. I was inspired by a relative's friend who is K-9 police officer and their GSD's are trained in Turkish. It's fun and they learned it very quickly...not surprising for a BC of course!

 

Tim

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Does anyone speak in tongues to their dogs on the trial field,m or in training?

 

There have been times when I probably sounded like I was speaking in tongues to my dogs, especially at agility trials. :rolleyes:

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My daughter who is fascinated by the Japanese culture is teaching all her commands for agility in japanese

 

 

Is your daughter an otaku and an anime fan as well? :rolleyes:

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My daughter who is fascinated by the Japanese culture is teaching all her commands for agility in japanese
i'm on the fence on this one...i live in japan...speak fair japanese, better english obviously...still no pup...but i'm reading tons-o-stuff...i debating weather to teach commands in japanese/english or both....there are advantages to all three...

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Where's Carla? She teaches her dogs commands in German, like they do in schutzhund. It's cool and all, but then she got a Border Collie. It's pretty funny to hear "PLATZ!" come out of our herding trainer's mouth instead of "LIE DOWN!". :rolleyes:

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i'm on the fence on this one...i live in japan...speak fair japanese, better english obviously...still no pup...but i'm reading tons-o-stuff...i debating weather to teach commands in japanese/english or both....there are advantages to all three...

 

Why not both? It's pretty fun. I never thought of it until the other day and they both took to it quickly because I paired the hand signal to the new word. I would do one than the other, english or japanese first then do the other as to not confuse the dog.

 

Tim

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I tried training Solo in French for a while because I was worried that hearing English command terms used in everyday speech would confuse him. But he has no problem distinguishing words used as commands and words used in conversation, so I dropped it.

 

That said, when I first got Fly she didn't understand me unless I faked a Welsh accent. Thankfully, she got over that.

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Haha Melanie about Fly needing a Welsh accent :D See, luckily my dog is not that particular - though his English is certaintly with a Romanian accent, he can easily understand perfect American English :rolleyes: But he does pick up certain words in our day-to-day conversations and reacts to them - not quite as intense as when we're addressing him with the commands, but he stops whatever he's doing and looks at us and is ready to do something if we give him the ok. Kindda like "Are you talking to me?!" reaction.

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That said, when I first got Fly she didn't understand me unless I faked a Welsh accent. Thankfully, she got over that.

 

Ha! I bought Nick from a Southerner. It took him a month or so to figure out that I was not asking him to do everything fast- I just don't have a drawl!

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Where's Carla? She teaches her dogs commands in German, like they do in schutzhund. It's cool and all, but then she got a Border Collie. It's pretty funny to hear "PLATZ!" come out of our herding trainer's mouth instead of "LIE DOWN!". :D

 

"PLATZ" just sounds so impressive, especially when you yell it for an emergency down!! I always wonder if it makes a bigger impression on the dog than "lie down" :rolleyes:

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Why not both? It's pretty fun. I never thought of it until the other day and they both took to it quickly because I paired the hand signal to the new word. I would do one than the other, english or japanese first then do the other as to not confuse the dog.

 

Tim

i just might...and i just may use your training method...

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"PLATZ" just sounds so impressive, especially when you yell it for an emergency down!! I always wonder if it makes a bigger impression on the dog than "lie down" :rolleyes:

 

Funny to see "platz" being mentioned. When I first got Shoshone, she would cower and freeze if I used the word 'sit', even if I was talking to Sam. "Platz" was the only word I knew that meant 'sit' in another language, so I used that. She caught on right away, and pretty soon everyone at the dog park knew to use "platz" for her, and then their dogs all started responding to "platz" as well as sit.

 

She was afraid of a couple other words, too, I think down was one of them, so I started using "chill", I think. It was all so looong ago.

 

Dogs can learn new languages easier than I can, I think.

 

Ruth

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I've being using istuvat as my sit and alas as down. I used istuvat the other day with my family while hiking, they were impressed. My brother likes to say to them "I like your istuvating, Tobey." hahaha

 

Tim

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Actually if you use hand signals a lot you can say almost anything to a dog and they'll do what you want. My friends are very impressed that I tell the dogs to "Get into the car in a proper manner" then they enter one at a time. Ladies first then Jin. :rolleyes:

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