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I don't think they've figured that one out. You can get the lighter coats with rough to rough too, so I'd be tempted to think it's something separate.

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You only get those semi coats when you breed from lines that have smooth and rough mixed. Lines that are solid, heavy ruff (aka show lines, some old working lines) don't produce that variety.

 

I'm sort of glad we don't know everything....how boring would that be :rolleyes:

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Are you talking about smooths with really fringy tails/butts and plush coats, or true roughs with some fringe on the ears and forelegs? I've had dogs of my own that had parents with super huge coats and their own coats were very moderate. Trim was like that - she was bred Imp Dale/Lad and you know what those lines are like. The hair on her body was so short there was barely a fringe on her belly, and she barely had foreleg fringes. Bizarrely, she had a tail plume to rival the magnificant Mr. Woo's.

 

Ben was from Wisp (Mr. Huge Rough Coat) and old Tony Diaz stock (remember the picture ad in the mags for "Imp Roy"? - Ben's grandsire). But it was years before people stopped calling him "her." He was not neutered until he was a year old, too. He had a littermate, a female, that I saw at maturity and if you squinted you'd swear she was a smooth coat.

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Are you calling my bitch a mix :D

 

Yep, and she eats table food too :rolleyes:

 

Rebecca that is some of what I refer too. I also have the double coated extra long smooths. Does that make sense? You've seen Beinn.

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I bred a very rough coated bitch to a moderately rough coat male with fur that had a texture closer to malamute or fox than most BCs. I got pups that ranged from medium coat (long but relatively thin) to rough, very rough and malamute/fox like.

 

I think that when it comes to the variety of coat tyes there are likely modifier genes that have nothing to do with how long a dog's fur is, or there are variations in the actual genes themselves. More and more scientists are discovering that seemingly random repeated sequences at the ends of genes, which vary in length from one individual to another, can modify those genes to cause variations in expression.

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