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A new BC puppy - lemon white, coat question


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Welcome to the USBCC Boards!

 

Have you read the "Read this First" that is linked at the top of the index page? If you have been reading these boards for any time, or have read "Read this First", you will be aware that a pet shop is not a good place at all to obtain a puppy, and the sale of pups in pet shops does not promote responsible breeding practices. That said, I hope that you and your pup have a long and happy, healthy relationship together.

 

I would hazard a guess that she will be rough-coated, but that can be anything from a very dense, very fluffy coat to one that is silky and sleek. Coat length, along with color, is not the important issue but being well-bred and healthy are what is significant.

 

I wish you both the best and hope that you learn a great deal here from knowledgeable and caring members of the boards.

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She's cute. I'd guess medium rough coat, but she's still too young to be able to tell just yet.

 

What's done is done, enjoy your puppy, but please do some research before you buy your next dog. Buying a pet store dog supports the horrific puppy mill industry. :rolleyes:

 

Anyway, moving on...just some unsolicited advice, but please be sure to socialize, socialize and socialize your puppy some more! There's another thread about a 14 week old super timid puppy who was a pet store purchase at 10 weeks. Those puppies do not get the good socialization and upbringing that a puppy from a responsible breeder does. In order to avoid the problems the other poster is having, let your puppy meet as many people as possible, take her to as many safe places that you can to get her used to the sights and sounds. Enroll her in a puppy class and expose her to other friendly, healthy dogs.

 

Have fun with her!

 

ETA: I just read your last question...make sure you've had her vet checked. Did she come with medical records of vaccinations and the like? Take those with you to your vet, so that she is not over vaccinated. As I said above, she may be at a disadvantage in some areas due to where she came from, but you can make sure she grows up as healthy and well adjusted as possible.

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Aww..

 

the pet shop didn't give me her birth certificate when i bought her..

 

she is very energetic, any chance for her to be unhealthy puppy?

A lack of energy in a puppy would be a worrisome sign with regards to health and other issues. But, many health issues are not seen in a youngster and only are visible with growth and maturity. In general, a pet shop is probably one of the worst places to find a truly well-bred, healthy pup. The source of pups for pet shops is often puppy mills, wholesale puppy distributors (who get their pups from puppy mills, in general), and back-yard breeders (folks who are not following a sound breeding plan of any sort).

 

Pet shop puppy sales prey on customers by offering cute pups, oftentimes described as "rare" (colors, breeds, cross-breds), without any regards to a responsible background in terms of breeding or health.

 

Again, have you read "Read this First", which is linked at the top of the index page? It will give you a very good idea of the tone of these boards and what most of the members believe in in terms of responsible breeding.

 

I would suggest that you make sure to take you puppy (and her health record, record of vaccinations, wormings, and health checks like eye screenings) to your vet as soon as possible. She should most definitely have her eyes CERF tested, be checked for worms and parasites (both very prevalent in pet shop/puppy mill/back-yard-bred pups), and given any needed vaccinations and worming/parasite medications.

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thanks for the information :rolleyes:

 

Cherry and i do at least 1 hours walk every day, and we go to dog park once every week.

 

She likes to chew on everything, furniture, carpet, curtain, door....etc , except her toy and ball.....

no matter how hard i try to attract her attention with toy or ball, it never works.....

 

every morning when i waked up, there is always a suprise waiting for me in the back yard or in the house.

she is such a little destroyer...

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A lack of energy in a puppy would be a worrisome sign with regards to health and other issues. But, many health issues are not seen in a youngster and only are visible with growth and maturity. In general, a pet shop is probably one of the worst places to find a truly well-bred, healthy pup. The source of pups for pet shops is often puppy mills, wholesale puppy distributors (who get their pups from puppy mills, in general), and back-yard breeders (folks who are not following a sound breeding plan of any sort).

 

Pet shop puppy sales prey on customers by offering cute pups, oftentimes described as "rare" (colors, breeds, cross-breds), without any regards to a responsible background in terms of breeding or health.

 

Again, have you read "Read this First", which is linked at the top of the index page? It will give you a very good idea of the tone of these boards and what most of the members believe in in terms of responsible breeding.

 

I would suggest that you make sure to take you puppy (and her health record, record of vaccinations, wormings, and health checks like eye screenings) to your vet as soon as possible. She should most definitely have her eyes CERF tested, be checked for worms and parasites (both very prevalent in pet shop/puppy mill/back-yard-bred pups), and given any needed vaccinations and worming/parasite medications.

 

Thanks Sue, i have read "Read this First" and cherry have done vaccinations and worming/parasite medications.

for her health issue when she is mature, is it possible for me to minimise the risk by offering better food and more exercise for her?

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I am getting the impression that your native language might not be English, and that you may be located overseas? You don't say how old she is now, which might be helpful to know.

 

Pups often don't care for "their" toys and balls, unless you are playing with them. Also offer more appealing chew toys - various rawhides and rawhide-based chews, suitable bones (never cooked chicken or pork bones, but preferably raw bones like beef, lamb, or pork rib bones, lamb or pork neck bones, raw chicken wings, necks, or backs, and similar bones that are not too hard on the teeth but that provide a lot of good, healthy, interesting chewing).

 

If you want to avoid "destruction", you should consider using a crate when you are not able to supervise her or overnight when you are asleep. It also is a help for housetraining.

 

You can use the "search" function at the top of the page to help you find previous topics that might be of interest to you.

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Something I found great at keeping my pup's attention was a plastic jar, filled with kibble. Punch a few holes in the jar so that kibble can fall out as it rolls around, and they'll just flip it for hours tryng to get the treats. Always supervise during this so that the plastic jar doesn't get consumed. Young pups (mine anyways) never was able to chew parts off, but always be observant.

as mentioned, crate training is great, it provides a safe comfortable bed for those times you can't watch junior. Never leave the pup to it's own devices, this is how bad things happen (electrical cords, furniture damage, etc)

You mention no papers, I would imagine that selling a dog as a PB would require papers, I believe here in Canada it does. I'd go ask. either way, enjoy your new pup. These guys are brilliant by the way, and need lots of mental stimulation. I train mine for 2-3 minutes, 8 times a day.

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OH MY! She is way too flipping cute. I wish there was an internet feature that allowed me to reach through the screen and hug that puppy!

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thanks for the information :rolleyes:

 

Cherry and i do at least 1 hours walk every day, and we go to dog park once every week.

 

She likes to chew on everything, furniture, carpet, curtain, door....etc , except her toy and ball.....

no matter how hard i try to attract her attention with toy or ball, it never works.....

 

every morning when i waked up, there is always a suprise waiting for me in the back yard or in the house.

she is such a little destroyer...

Welcome to the Boards as well!

 

If you are new to puppies, it can be a road full of frustration, joy, excitement and stress -- especially when the puppy grows into a teenager!

I strongly recommend that you do some reading about how to raise a happy, healthy dog. A very good series of books is by Ian Dunbar, called Before You Get Your Puppy and After You Get Your Puppy (no, I don't get a commission :D ).

You can buy them online or order from your local bookstore.

Online: http://www.dogwise.com/search.cfm

 

There is a wealth of information and really sensible training tips in these books. At the very least, see if you can get a crate to start crate-training your puppy so you don't have any more 'accidents', since as was already mentioned by Sue, some can be deadly :D .

 

Do let us know how you get on.

Ailsa

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Oh my! Cherry first I would like to ask you to remain here as an active member of this forum. It sounds like you don't have a lot of experience with BC's and you may save yourself a lot of heartache by being here. Ask any question you like. Next I would like to suggest you stay away from dog parks. I almost lost a vaccinated puppy to parvo that way. If your puppy becomes listless, starts vomiting or won't eat or drink take her to a vet at once.

 

Finally there is a lot to read here. Some of it is very general and some of it is for specific dogs like Jin, Rhys and Kaycee. It is some very strong reading in some cases.

 

Lastly, and I have a problem saying this, if you ever find yourself unable to keep or care for your puppy let us know first, please.

 

BCs are very special dogs and we care for all of them. Welcome to our community.

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I agree with your statement, desertranger, that Border Collies are very special dogs. Unlike any other.

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That coat color (what Australians and show dog people call "red," and the rest of us call "yellow" or sometimes "Australian red") is almost always found exclusively in dogs with a show dog background, so my guess is that Cherry (who is ridiculously adorable, by the way) will have a very full, rough coat. In Australasia, smooth coats are not accepted in the show ring.

 

She is too young to have the run of the house or to be left in the yard alone. I would recommend that she be crated or confined to a puppy-safe area (like with a pen in the kitchen or thereabouts, so that she can't get into anything) when you are not able to supervise her. This means a lot of active supervision on your part since pups should not spend too much time isolated like that, but that's the fun part of puppies.

 

Be careful not to give her TOO much exercise (too hard on growing bones and joints) and of strange dogs. At her age, socializing with known dogs in controlled environments is key -- that, and being exposed (in a positive manner) to as many people and places as you can take her. She is too young to be safe against parvovirus even if she has had her first series of shots, so be careful. I raised my puppy in the city and took her to the park when she was Cherry's age, but I knew it was a calculated risk (and I had no yard, so I had no choice) and was extremely vigilant for any signs of illness. If in doubt, get her to the vet right away -- look for lethargy and diarrhea. Parvo kills quickly so fast treatment is very important.

 

And everyone else has already said it, but next time, avoid pet stores.

 

Good luck!

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Also, when you take her to the vet, make sure and HOLD HER THE WHOLE TIME! Do not let her on the floor. There are hundreds of sick dogs that pee and poop on the vet floor all week long, and despite their best attempts at sterolising with a disinfectant spray, your puppy can still contract something serious. Save yourself time, money, stress, and possible heartbreak by holding it and not setting it down for a second.

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I am getting the impression that your native language might not be English, and that you may be located overseas? You don't say how old she is now, which might be helpful to know.

 

Pups often don't care for "their" toys and balls, unless you are playing with them. Also offer more appealing chew toys - various rawhides and rawhide-based chews, suitable bones (never cooked chicken or pork bones, but preferably raw bones like beef, lamb, or pork rib bones, lamb or pork neck bones, raw chicken wings, necks, or backs, and similar bones that are not too hard on the teeth but that provide a lot of good, healthy, interesting chewing).

 

If you want to avoid "destruction", you should consider using a crate when you are not able to supervise her or overnight when you are asleep. It also is a help for housetraining.

 

You can use the "search" function at the top of the page to help you find previous topics that might be of interest to you.

 

i am an oversea student in Brisbane, Australia. Cherry now is 4 month old, she is growing very quickly but her coat doesn't seems to grow(only a little bit). i had tried the crate training.....but she won't stop barking

 

i heard people say, if dog is eating raw meat with blood, they will tend to be more aggresive, is that true? i always wanted to buy her some chicken necks for treat.

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Yes, you may have tried crate training, but it seems that she has trained you (she barks, you give in and don't crate her) rather than you training her. It is not easy to properly train a puppy but you must realize that you are always training, whether you realize that or not. And, with a very smart puppy, she will have you "trained" very quickly - and that's probably not going to be what you want in your relationship with her.

 

No, dogs eating raw does not make them aggressive. You can "search" many topics on these boards concerning "raw feeding" in its many variations. Just remember that, when you are introducing anything new, to do so gradually to avoid stomach/intestine upsets.

 

Cherry's coat is a puppy coat right now and it will be a while before her adult coat begins to come in noticeably. Give it time.

 

Maybe I've missed it, but I still am not aware of just how old she is now. The photos were labelled that she was seven weeks when they were taken.

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You have to train her to be good in the crate. Train her in 15 mminute intervals at first, let her go in on her own, throw a treat in there and let her follow it in. Close the door slowly and calmly behind her. Leaver her in and ignore her for 15 minutes. If she is barking, DO NOT OPEN THE DOOR, NO MATTER HOW LONG. Just ignore her, until she is quiet for at least a couple of minutes. Then go open the door and praise her extensively for being a good girl. Play with her, take her outside, etc. 30 minutes later, repeat the exercise. Every day you can add a few minutes. But, you never want to leave your dog in its crate more hours than twice the number of months it is old. Does that make sense?

 

If it's 2 months old, no more than 4 hours at a time in the crate.

3 months old, no more than 6 hours

4 months or older, no more than 8 hours.

 

You should never ever leave a dog crated for more than 8 hours at a time, they could get a bladder infection.

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You have to train her to be good in the crate. Train her in 15 mminute intervals at first, let her go in on her own, throw a treat in there and let her follow it in. Close the door slowly and calmly behind her. Leaver her in and ignore her for 15 minutes. If she is barking, DO NOT OPEN THE DOOR, NO MATTER HOW LONG. Just ignore her, until she is quiet for at least a couple of minutes. Then go open the door and praise her extensively for being a good girl. Play with her, take her outside, etc. 30 minutes later, repeat the exercise. Every day you can add a few minutes. But, you never want to leave your dog in its crate more hours than twice the number of months it is old. Does that make sense?

 

If it's 2 months old, no more than 4 hours at a time in the crate.

3 months old, no more than 6 hours

4 months or older, no more than 8 hours.

 

You should never ever leave a dog crated for more than 8 hours at a time, they could get a bladder infection.

 

OK!!!!!

 

Looks like i gotta prepare lots of pig nose for her! :rolleyes:

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Yes, you may have tried crate training, but it seems that she has trained you (she barks, you give in and don't crate her) rather than you training her. It is not easy to properly train a puppy but you must realize that you are always training, whether you realize that or not. And, with a very smart puppy, she will have you "trained" very quickly - and that's probably not going to be what you want in your relationship with her.

 

No, dogs eating raw does not make them aggressive. You can "search" many topics on these boards concerning "raw feeding" in its many variations. Just remember that, when you are introducing anything new, to do so gradually to avoid stomach/intestine upsets.

 

Cherry's coat is a puppy coat right now and it will be a while before her adult coat begins to come in noticeably. Give it time.

 

Maybe I've missed it, but I still am not aware of just how old she is now. The photos were labelled that she was seven weeks when they were taken.

 

ya....sometimes i feel food is her master and i am the slave.....when i have food in my hand....she quickly follows every command, when i don't....then it all depends on her mood

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Can't let her do that. She has to listen with ot without food. Just be patient and remember part of raising a border collie is frustration.

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:rolleyes: I can't see the pictures very well, my computer is doing something funky with them. She looks smooth coated, does she have a white patch between here ears on her forehead? She reminds me of Rhonda, she was 1/8 BC 7/8 ACD and was that color before her adult coat came in, these were of Rhonda last summer:

IMG_2712.JPG

 

IMG_2757.JPG

 

Deb

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Can't let her do that. She has to listen with ot without food. Just be patient and remember part of raising a border collie is frustration.

 

Using treats worked fine for me and my dogs. HOWEVER, of course you do need to wean them off of the treats, and eventualy do it without treats. My girls are extreemly obidient, with or without any apparant prize in it for them - i.e. me holding a treat is never the motivation, I will rarely hold a treat anymore when getting them to do something - but at first, this is a very effective method, just not a permanent one.

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