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One of the vets I work with was visiting family for the holidays, and turns out one of his relatives thought this "little" guy was a great Xmas gift for his 87 year old grandmother... :rolleyes:

 

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Yes, thats a 10wk old GSD. And he is awfully CUTE.

 

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Turns out, the little guy has strangles. The Dr. brought him in Friday, intending to board him for the weekend, but with the little guy on steroids all weekend, I couldn't stand the thought of him being all miserable and alone all weekend at the clinic with only a few potty breaks a day...so I offered to take him home this weekend and treat him, up until they figure out what they're going to do with him. He's a great lil' pup, and SO clever. I've never really worked with GSDs, so any tips would be appreciated! LoL. He's taking crate training like a pro, and Monkey is his best friend!

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He's adorable. But I bet that grandmother is going to hate that relative in a few months when the dog starts chewing, digging, and begging for some tpe of good physical and mental stimulation.

 

It reminds me of what my cousin did to my grandmother. My cousin found a stray Pittie mix and gave it to my 75 year old gramdmother has a present :rolleyes: (Thankfully, my grandmother is a huge dog lover and has been for years so everything has worked out and he's turing into a lovely dog!)

 

Kudos to you for taking him in for the weekend and I hope he gets well soon :D

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One of the vets I work with was visiting family for the holidays, and turns out one of his relatives thought this "little" guy was a great Xmas gift for his 87 year old grandmother... :rolleyes:

 

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Oh no! That is just wrong.... :D Very, very cute but wrong.

How is an old lady going to manage a very large, strong-willed GSD?

I think this has to end in disaster, unless it can be re-homed...maybe to your house? :D

Ailsa

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I cannot even talk my dear BF into a 3rd BC, much LESS a GSD who will one day outweigh all three of my current canines put together! (Though he IS really fond of the 'little' guy) LOL!!!

 

I do believe the Dr. who took him is going to be working out some sort of strategy to ensure he does NOT go back to his grandmother. At least, I hope so....I just KNOW if she keeps him, that by the time he turns 9 months she'll have a broken hip or worse. They chose to get her a GSD because way back in the day her family had one they were very fond of....I still don't know *quite* what they were thinking!

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A quick rehoming sounds like the best thing for everyone. Certainly Grandmother can see that?

 

There's an elderly woman who walks a GSD at a park near here. She's always got him on leash, but if another dog comes near him, he will try to attack. She's good about warning people not to bring their dogs close, and she has the dog trained pretty well - he does a solid "sit" by her as other dogs pass. It's probably as good a situation as it could be, for what it is. But it's still far from ideal. I worry that the woman will simply stumble someday, or be pulled over by the big dog, and have a fight on her hands that she can't control. Not to mention the worry that falling the wrong way at her age can be very, very serious!

 

Mary

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Hello everyone,

 

While I commend the family for their intentions (presumably to provide companionship for their 87 year old grandmother), I agree that getting a puppy for her was not in the best interests of either species. I would imagine that there are many wonderful adult GSDs deserving of a good home that would be far better suited for this situation, and I suggest that the family contact their local GSD rescue organization.

Regards,

nancy

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I don't mean to be a downer, but this reminds me of a very sad eval that I did about two years ago. The grown children got their mother, who was in her 80's, a Border Collie puppy as a gift. She really wanted a small dog, which would have been much more appropriate for her, but they got her a Border Collie.

 

She was self sufficient, but not terribly active outside of her own home, and so didn't walk the dog. She had a very small exercise pen in her yard. The dog went from the house to the yard and back and that was about it.

 

Since she couldn't really do much to meet the dog's needs, she fed him and fed him and fed him. She was able to keep him entertained by putting food in an interactive toy and he would slam it around and entertain himself by getting the food out.

 

She tried obeidience class, but found it too much to handle. The dog was about a year old when she decided to rehome him.

 

The really sad part was that the dog had some very serious resource guarding issues. I can't say that those were caused by the dog's life situation, but the fact that all the dog really had in life was food certainly didn't help matters. While I was trying to arrange to get someone in to evaluate the dog's potential for rehabilitation, she decided that she couldn't wait (I think he might have bitten her) and she turned him in to the local shelter and he was put down. From what I had seen, it probably was too late for this dog.

 

Of course the woman was totally broken up about the whole situation and I felt really bad for her.

 

And I've always wondered what her children were thinking. It was really a shame.

 

I sincerely hope this guy fares much, much better. He looks like a sweet puppy.

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Good to hear that rehomming may be an option.

 

There is an elderly lady next door to me and she has 2 ancient GSD's, they are lovely old dogs. They do spend a lot of time outside and they do bark a lot, but I've learned her command for getting them to quiet and they listen to me through the fence. She told me a story one day about how she misses walking them and playing with them, but she's just too old. I think it's good that the dogs are about as old as she is otherwise her situation might be a disaster waiting to happen!

 

I wouldn't mind seeing more pictures while you have him.... :rolleyes:

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Just to add a (hope?) positive note...

 

A lot depends on the old woman and her family - and the dog. I had a BC/GSD who could run 20-30 miles if given a chance, but who also could live happily in an apartment with a daily walk. And I'll assume (hope?) someone getting a dog for an 87 year old woman plans on providing support. I've known several families that were able to live across the street or a couple of houses down from their Mom.

 

I spent part of last night reading the threads from last year, with the guy who just knew he wanted a Border Collie, ignored what seemed like 100 posts of advice, and then 9 months later posted that he wanted to get rid of the dog - and then ignored offers to help/rehome. So I understand why folks assume the worst. And I would be more confident if it was a mutt - most of my mutts have been calmer dogs.

 

But getting a woman that old a large dog...I'd LIKE to think the family didn't do it out of sheer stupidity.

 

EDIT/ADD - my pound mutt is 80 lbs of gentle affection. He loves quiet (good luck - Border Collie pup arriving tonight & a 5 month old Aussie already here!), and when INSIDE he is the gentlest, calmest dog I've ever met. He doesn't care about food. He lives for gentle pets. He would be an awesome dog for an old woman with a good yard whose family could walk him once a day. Now, if he gets loose...then he's a runner. But apart from that, he would be a fine dog for an old woman. And no, I'm not going to let him leave - he's going to have to put up with us & the pups!

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Well, it's not even the exercise part or strength of the dog that I was first concerned with, but the sheer age of the women. She's 87 and she will most likely pass away before her dog, if not within the first half of the dogs life, and then what? It's better to re-home now then eventually re-home later.

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Some random thoughts:

 

As someone who is getting on in years, it never ceases to amaze me how many people immediately associate age with physical or mental infirmity. I have seen people in their 50's who have difficulty with mobility; and I have seen people in their 80's (and even 90's) who are physically active and mentally sharp. At my age, I still referee soccer, and annually spend two full days at one charity tournament, doing up to 15 games in that time span; I also hike with Annie, and row (no motor) my boat when I go fishing. Before presuming that a dog should be re-homed due to someone's age, wouldn't it be prudent to know the owner's circumstances?

 

A puppy might not be the best option for an elderly person. But a dog may bring solace to one who has no one to keep her company for much of the time. When Missy was alive, I took her to convalescent homes on weekends. I saw people who had not had visitors in weeks, months, years...their loneliness was heart-breaking. They were so pleased to be able to pet a dog, and to excahnge affection with her. Annie and I still make the trips, and the joy she brings cannot be adequately expressed. Unless you've seen loneliness up close and personal, you can't begin to understand how devastating it is...

 

I'm surprised that no one has offered another option. Rather than re-home the dog, those who gave her the dog could go the extra step and stop by to care for it on a regular basis. They could also invest the time to take the dog to assisted-living training classes; that way, the dog would not only be a companion, but also could help the woman.

 

But then again, that is only my perspective...

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The plans for this puppy was to make him a 'farm dog'...he was being kept out of doors, and he had 4+ acres to roam. From the way the Dr. put it, it did not seem as though she had much help with the puppy available, which is why he's so concerned about possibly finding a better home.

 

More pictures you say??

 

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...Rather than re-home the dog, those who gave her the dog could go the extra step and stop by to care for it on a regular basis. They could also invest the time to take the dog to assisted-living training classes; that way, the dog would not only be a companion, but also could help the woman...

My Mom was in her 70s when her last dog died - a poodle/something dog that devoted 15 years to loving her. We seriously considered getting her another dog, with the knowledge one of us was likely to inherit the dog a few years into the future. My sister live about 1/4 mile away. We didn't, largely because my Mom was concerned that it would hurt too bad when she needed to give the dog to one of her kids.

 

I certainly wouldn't recommend someone get a GSD for a woman in her late 80s, but I wouldn't want to condemn it without knowing a lot more. I'm guessing the kids are 60-ish...usually old enough to know better, if they don't have a plan in mind. Both shepherd mixes I've owned - Chris at 100+ lbs and Dan at 80 lbs - would have been fine old woman dogs. Gentle, loving, low-care and devoted.

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Wow....that's not a good way to do it this way.

 

I got my husband Asker for his Birthday/Christmas gift since he always wanted a border collie and we were missing our Aspen. So our intentions were not related to the holidays but as "early gift" to dh. So he picked Asker and we got her around 1st week of December and love her to pieces already. We aren't 87 but young couple...so I just hate seeing how ppl think pets can make a good gift..it doesn't work that way especially if the person never talked/wanted a dog in the first place. If it's a decision made together and picked together...that is a better deal for the pup.

 

I remember a lady got her husband a border collie even though he loved the breed and the problem was she got it for him for his birthday and she didn't take in factor that he works night shift and works full time all day which meant no time for the pup. The end result was kind of sad; she and he got divorced...but at least she took the dog with her. But....still...it's hard for her since SHE works full time now being a single mom of 4 and her boyfriend is taking care of the dog.

 

Hope it works out very well for this dog; she's very cute!!!

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Bustopher, I can understand your sensitivity to references to age, but this woman is 87 years old! I don't care how spry she may be or how mentally sharp she may be, she is no match for a high energy, large breed puppy. I just spent several day's at my bf's parent's house along with his 90 year old grandmother whp was also visiting for Christmas.. She is about as spry and mentally sharp as any elderly person I know. But, even she would certainly be no match for a GSD puppy.

 

I think several people here suggested an older dog would be more appropriate, and I agree. But, a puppy is not appropriate under any circumstances no matter what, IMO. Even of she had help, is it fair for this puppy to grow up in a family where it has to rely on outside family members to work into their busy schedules time to exercise, sociaize, and train him? When the dog is just entering the prime of his life, this woman will be well into her 90's. What kind of lifw will this young dog have then? What happens if the woman becomes ill or can no longer take care of herself? Does the family have a contingency plan for the dog under that scenario?

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As someone who is getting on in years, it never ceases to amaze me how many people immediately associate age with physical or mental infirmity.

 

If an older person chooses the type of dog, truly feels that he or she can see to the dog's needs or else acquire appropriate help to do so, then more power to them.

 

My "what were they thinking?" response comes from the fact that grown children would spring any dog - particularly of an energetic breed - on an elderly parent. That's not an implication that the grandmother is infirm, but that he or she should absolutely be in on the choice of breed.

 

I sincerely hope that when I'm 87 I am mentally and physically up to the challenge of a Border Collie! But if I'm not, I won't want one sprung on me as a gift.

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I also understand the sensitivity to the age factor, but as I said before, even if this lady was active enough to go outside and run with this dog everyday which I'm sure plenty of 80-something people are, this dog will most likely need to be re-homed in the end anyways because the dog will probably outlive her. I think it's pretty clear by what Sarah has said that the family isn't going to be offering help to their grandmother, so I fear there really isn't another option. I mean, they very well could invest their time to do all that but if they thought about that ahead of time, I am going to bet they wouldn't have bought her the puppy in the first place. My concerns line up well with Mary's, and so I can't say much more.

 

I do however vote that Sarah keeps the little guy :rolleyes: (I'm only slightly kidding..)

 

Oh, and I might have missed it, but has the little one got a name yet?

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...But, a puppy is not appropriate under any circumstances no matter what, IMO. Even of she had help, is it fair for this puppy to grow up in a family where it has to rely on outside family members to work into their busy schedules time to exercise, sociaize, and train him? When the dog is just entering the prime of his life, this woman will be well into her 90's. What kind of lifw will this young dog have then? What happens if the woman becomes ill or can no longer take care of herself? Does the family have a contingency plan for the dog under that scenario?

Just speaking for myself - when we were considering another dog for my Mom (late 70s, about 10 years younger than this woman), we thought about all of those things. She had a small yard, and we were thinking about a smaller dog - but it isn't size that counts, but personality (which is an excellent reason for an older dog, not a puppy). My Mom was still walking 3 miles a day. She had a yard for the dog to play in. My sister was close, and she & their kids were willing to walk the dog regularly if my Mom couldn't. We all knew the dog would eventually end up living with one of us...what is bad about that?

 

As it turned out, my Mom decided she would rather not - too close to Suzy's death, and she knew it would hurt when it was time for her 'new' dog to go to the kids. But we all talked about it, and it would NOT have been a rash decision.

 

I would never recommend a woman in her 80s get a puppy. However, the family and woman haven't asked for my opinion. If she is still living on 4 acres by herself, I would guess she isn't the 'typical' 87 year old woman. BTW - my Mom went into assisted living at 82 and died at 85...she broke her hip about 80, and went downhill after that. If we HAD given her a dog, he/she would have been about 5 when he moved in with us. And up until the day she died, my Mom loved being around dogs.

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I'm opposed to gifting anyone with an actual puppy as a surprise - gifting a person with a puppy/dog that the recipient can select is totally different. The person raising/adopting/living with the pup/dog should be the one to select the breeder (or rescue or shelter)/sex/age, etc. IMO.

 

As for age, I can't imagine an 87 yo woman or man being able to manage a young GSD without some significant help - if the person lives with family who is able to provide for the dog's physical needs, the dog could be appropriate but it's going to need training so that an older person doesn't get hurt. I'm in my 50's and slowing down some so I'm giving serious thought to whether it would be fair to acquire a bc pup/young dog when I lose Sara because while I can still walk for 5 miles or longer, I'm not up to running an agility course or other extremely energetic activities - and while bc's are my preferred breed, you need to be fair to the dog too, no matter how much you want a particular breed.

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My youngest Aussie came to me last year at 11 weeks of age, 3 weeks post being a "gift" to a 96 (yes NINETY SIX) year old women. The family who gave Sassy to her thought so much about it that they couldn't even remember where they bought her. They did however remember that she cost the princely sum of $125.

 

This dog could jump 5 foot fences at 11 weeks of age. Baby gates were a joke. Exercise? Anyone got time for a 2 hour run? Oh yes, her tail is docked so short she has some bowel issues - when she has to go she has to GO, right now, no diddling to the door.

 

Yes, this was the perfect pet for a senior women in her 90's

 

People are so stupid sometimes that I don't know they manage to feed themselves. But they do...that and breed...they are very good at making more stupid people :rolleyes:

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