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CJ_&_Mitch

Unsure about his outrun; then... too fast!

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This is similar to the post about pacing. My "young" (at herding) BC seems to be of "two minds". When I first release him to do an outrun, he tends to be quite tentative -- "am i doing this right?" -- then, once past me (i'm fairly close to the stock), he speeds up, swings around, and comes in too fast on the sheep. All "heck" breaks loose and they're all charging down on me. Only downing him slows the stampede.

 

I read the article on flip-flopping in the magazine and it is true that after circling him (and figure-8s) he eventually slows down. But the combination of insecurity and then over-exuberance is perplexing. If I jazz him up for a better outrun, he just comes in faster on the sheep.

 

There's something I'm just not quite getting into his brain... (btw: he is 2+, but only working a few months)

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Me too but we have Aussies. How do we slow them down? Our Sam grips too. Working on figure 8's and changing directions. Not getting any better; worse in fact. He won't down either. He stops sometimes. Help! N

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Ok - the tentativeness should disappear, this is not necessarily a bad thing because it is an indication he is thinking on the way out. You need to get control at the top. Once you send him, you need to be on the move, ready to push him off at the top so that he brings the sheep quietly.

 

Good luck -

Vergil

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Me too but we have Aussies. How do we slow them down? Our Sam grips too. Working on figure 8's and changing directions. Not getting any better; worse in fact. He won't down either. He stops sometimes. Help! N

 

 

Aussies have a tendency to get in too tight...you have to push them off the sheep to start the slow down process. You have to be fair, firm and consistant...you can't push off one time and then give it up the next.

 

Good Luck -

Vergil

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Thank you so much. We know we need to be more firm and consistent but haven't quite got the hang of it. Will keep trying as we have a great dog here; just need to let him show his stuff. N

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Ok - the tentativeness should disappear, this is not necessarily a bad thing because it is an indication he is thinking on the way out. You need to get control at the top. Once you send him, you need to be on the move, ready to push him off at the top so that he brings the sheep quietly.

 

Good luck -

Vergil

 

Thanks for the reassurance... pushing him off at the top seems to be a reoccurring theme for us. The "sensitive-dog" syndrome (strong corrections and he lies down/shuts down) has made training him an "interesting challenge" for a newbie handler (me).

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Thanks for the reassurance... pushing him off at the top seems to be a reoccurring theme for us. The "sensitive-dog" syndrome (strong corrections and he lies down/shuts down) has made training him an "interesting challenge" for a newbie handler (me).

 

Do you understand what I mean by be on the move to push him off at the top? Also, it sounds like the dog might be coming in too tight.

Vergil

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I think I understand what you mean by on the move, ready to push him out. But can you explain it a bit more so I can see if I truely understand?

TIA

Kristen

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I think I understand what you mean by on the move, ready to push him out. But can you explain it a bit more so I can see if I truely understand?

TIA

Kristen

 

Keep outrun short until you have good control at the top. as soon as you send the dog, go thorugh the sheep to meet him at the top to push him back and/or stop him...

 

 

Vergil

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That is what I thought. Thanks for the explanation.

Kristen

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