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I so appreciate the responses from Skyler, mbc, Redbirdie, Kyrasmom, and RuthBelle. I'm the daughter of a WWII POW, I'm married to a Vietnam vet w/PTSD, my brother was a Marine who spent some time in Vietnam. My dad and my brother were never diagnosed, so of course, they never got any help. DH is active in veterans affairs, and our circle of friends includes men and women w/PTSD and other injuries. I've learned a lot.

 

Kyrasmom, thanks to you in particular for pointing out that war is violence on a scale that people can not comprehend until they've experienced it. Redbirdie, research done by the VA and some non profit veterans organizations supports your statements, and not just in war related trauma. Individuals who experienced violence or extreme emotional trauma in their childhoods are astronomically more likely to develop PTSD after experiencing the same as adults.

 

Another interesting thing - stop reading if you're tired of the lecture - there are strong indications that changes in the way war is conducted, starting with the Korean War, have contributed to the increase in cases of PTSD. Through WWII, units, platoons, etc, formed, trained, shipped out, and returned together. You knew the men next to you, and you knew your commanding officers. Replacements came in only when casualties demanded it. Officers stayed with their unit for the duration of their tour.

 

Staring in Korea, and becoming common practice in Vietnam, officers were given 6 month tours, sometimes less. At the end of their tour, they were replaced. Even if they requested to be reassigned to their unit, they were replaced. Often the replacements were young, untried in combat, even just graduated from West Point. How much would you trust a 22 year old lieutenant who'd never been in a firefight, or been shot at, or shot at someone with the intention of killing them?

 

It's painful, it's awful, and it's all around us, it's all over the world. There's not a corner of the world that isn't ripped apart. We do need to do whatever we can.

 

Ruth n the BC3

 

PS - I'll be glad to post book titles for sources if anyone is interested, let me know, and I'll post them on the Coffee Break section.

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Certainly, this is unforgiveable; and I also am horrified. One cannot justify such conduct under any circumstance, just as one cannot rationalize or justify the deliberate killing of non-combatant women and children. But thankfully such demented people are in the minority, and the cross-section of people who serve our country mirrors the cross-section of our society. For every story of cruelty and insensitivity like this, there are countless stories of our troops' kindness children in Iraq, just as there are countless stories of their kindness to dogs, to the extent of going through extraordinary efforts to bring them home. Hopefully, the Marine Corps will handle this incident; but in our outrage, let's not overlook all of the good, kind, proud, and dedicated troops fighting in the Middle East, whether we agree with the mission or not.

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  • 3 months later...

Puppy-Killing Marine to be Booted

June 12, 2008

Associated Press

HONOLULU - The Marine Corps is expelling one Marine and disciplining another for their roles in a video showing a Marine throwing a puppy off a cliff while on patrol in Iraq.

 

The 17-second video posted on YouTube drew sharp condemnation from animal rights groups when it came to light in March.

 

The clip shows two Marines joking before one hurls the puppy into a rocky gully. A yelping sound is heard as it flips through the air.

 

Marine Corps Base Hawaii said in a news release Wednesday that Lance Cpl. David Motari received unspecified "non-judicial punishment" and "is being processed for separation" from the Marine Corps.

 

The second Marine, Sgt. Crismarvin Banez Encarnacion also received unspecified "non-judicial" punishment.

 

 

This story is on military.com. One idiot is being discharged and the Sergeant received NJP, non-judicial punishment.

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So, is my understanding correct that "non-judicial" means that no legal action is taken within military judiciary rule? If so, that is still total crap. He probably got dishonorably discharged, which means he just lost his job and got to come home from war early - like that is punishment. The other probably either lost some rank at best.

 

It would have been sick enough for these individuals to have done the act but it goes way beyond sick when they video record and publish it. These two shouldnt see the light of day outside of a military prison IMO. What is even scarier is that one is probably still going to be armed and fighting along side our families with judgement like that and the other is being released back into the general population. It is a proven fact that torture of animals of this nature is precursory to more serious issues such as child abuse and molestation, spousal abuse and general violent and deviant behavior. Like I want him for a neighbor :rolleyes:

 

Ryan

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Military commanders have the authority to convene non-judicial procedings that do not rise to the level of a court martial. I'm not saying this should not have been. The Sergeant may well have been demoted, fined, put on restriction and other things.

 

I spent 26 years and 20 days as a Navy Corpsman. Many of them with the Marines. Believe me, the Marines are not proud of these two.

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