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I STILL agree with RDM. However harshly you all think her or her wording to be.

 

It is hard not to be so angry when you feel so passionately about something like this, and yet are not able to get through to

someone. That makes it even harder!!

 

If you really want to breed your dog, just take a walk through any humane society or shelter. I hope it quickly changes your mind.

 

You should not be breeding unless you really know what you are doing and can find homes for all your pups.

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Ugh. Sherry, you should read this:

 

 

I am posting this (and it is long) because I think our society needs a huge “Wake-up” call. As a shelter manager, I am going to share a little insight with you all...a view from the inside if you will. First off, this is a forum to for adoption and/or rehoming as clearly stated in the rules. All of you breeders/sellers on craigslist should not only be flagged (and I hope the good people on craigslist will continue to do so with blind fury), but you should be made to work in the “back” of an animal shelter for just one day. Maybe if you saw the life drain from a few sad, lost, confused eyes, you would change your mind about breeding and selling to people you don’t even know…that puppy you just sold will most likely end up in my shelter when it’s not a cute little puppy anymore. So how would you feel if you knew that there’s about a 90% chance that dog will never walk out of the shelter it is going to be dumped at? Purebred or not! About 50% of all of the dogs that are “owner surrenders” or “strays”, that come into my shelter are purebred dogs. The most common excuses I hear are; “We are moving and we can’t take our dog (or cat).” Really? Where are you moving too that doesn’t allow pets? Or they say “The dog got bigger than we thought it would”. How big did you think a German Shepherd would get? “We don’t have time for her…”. Really? I work a 10-12 hour day and still have time for my 6 dogs! “She’s tearing up our yard…”. How about making her a part of your family? They always tell me “We just don’t want to have to stress about finding a place for her…we know she’ll get adopted, she’s a good dog”. Odds are your pet won’t get adopted & how stressful do you think being in a shelter is? Well, let me tell you…your pet has 72 hours to find a new family from the moment you drop it off…sometimes a little longer if the shelter isn’t full and your dog manages to stay completely healthy…if it sniffles, it dies. Your pet will be confined to a small run/kennel in a room with about 25 other barking or crying animals. It will have to relieve itself where it eats and sleeps. It will be depressed and it will cry constantly for the family that abandoned it. If your pet is lucky, I will have enough volunteers in that day to take him/her for a walk. If I don’t, your pet won’t get any attention besides having a bowl of food slid under the kennel door and the waste sprayed out of its pen with a high-powered hose. If your dog is big, black or any of the “Bully” breeds (pit bull, rottie, mastiff, etc…) it was pretty much dead when you walked it through the front door. Those dogs just don’t get adopted. If your dog doesn’t get adopted within its 72 hours and the shelter is full, it will be destroyed. If the shelter isn’t full and your dog is good enough, and of a desirable enough breed…it may get a stay of execution…not for long though. Most get very kennel protective after about a week and are destroyed for showing aggression…even the sweetest dogs will turn in this environment. If your pet makes it over all of those hurdles…chances are it will get kennel cough or an upper respiratory infection and will be destroyed because shelters just don’t have the funds to pay for even a $100 treatment. Here’s a little euthanasia 101 for those of you that have never witnessed a perfectly healthy, scared animal being “put-down”. First, your pet will be taken from its kennel on a leash…they always look like they think they are going for a walk…happy, wagging their tails. Until they get to “The Room”, every one of them freaks out and puts on the breaks when we get to the door…it must smell like death or they can feel the sad souls that are left in there, it’s strange, but it happens with every one of them. Your dog or cat will be restrained, held down by 1 or 2 vet techs depending on the size and how freaked out they are. Then a euthanasia tech or a vet will start the process…they will find a vein in the front leg and inject a lethal dose of the “pink stuff”. Hopefully your pet doesn’t panic from being restrained and jerk…I’ve seen the needles tear out of a leg and been covered with the resulting blood and deafened by the yelps and screams. They all don’t just “go to sleep”, sometimes spasm for a while, gasp for air and defecate on themselves. When it all ends, your pets corpse will be stacked like firewood in a large freezer in the back with all of the other animals that were killed…waiting to be picked up like garbage. What happens next? Cremated? Taken to the dump? Rendered into pet food? You’ll never know and it probably won’t even cross your mind…it was just an animal and you can always buy another one right?

 

I hope that those of you that have read this are bawling your eyes out and can’t get the pictures out of your head…I do everyday on the way home from work. I hate my job, I hate that it exists & I hate that it will always be there unless you people make some changes and realize that the lives you are affecting go much farther than the pets you dump at a shelter. Between 9 and 11 MILLION animals die every year in shelters and only you can stop it. I do my best to save every life I can but rescues are always full, and there are more animals coming in everyday than there are homes.

 

My point to all of this…DON’T BREED OR BUY WHILE SHELTER PETS DIE!

 

 

Hate me or flag me if you want to…the truth hurts and reality is what it is…I just hope I maybe changed one persons mind about breeding their dog, taking their loving pet to a shelter, or buying a dog. I hope that someone will walk into my shelter and say “I saw this thing on craigslist and it made me want adopt”…that would make it all worth it.

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Yes, it is very sad -- and the reason why us folks who do rescue do not take "accidents" lightly.

 

BTW, this was posted on craigslist and I felt it was very impactful and should be shared. I sent it to everyone I know. I believe most folks do not know (or choose to ignore) what happens to unwanted pets!

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Lin, I used to think it would be an good experience working at an animal shelter. After reading your post I realize I wouldn't be able to handle it. It would be like working at a prison where everyone is innocent and good, but all are on death row with just days to live. Its really sad.

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gosh, so much has been added to this since yesterday. I havent read it all yet and dont know if I will but-

Good lord, poor sherry, I am honestly realizing just how hard it is to communicate through a forum.

 

when I made the brightest match comment, I did not mean it that she (or you) was stupid, I meant that it seemed SOME others (not all) were just pointing out her ignorance (meant by: yeah, it is a big, preventable mistake/accident, NOT that she's dumb, I mean, she could be a rocket scientist for all know,) rather answering her question and giving her sound adive.

 

what I was trying to do was defend the fact that she is making an honest attempt to educate herself, and had already stated that she DID take the matter seriously, and DID NOT want to or mean to have the puppies.

 

 

of course now that I re read what I said I realize it probably sounded different. :rolleyes: I'll try to express myself more clearly from now on. :D ahh, good old miscommunication.

 

peace sherry, good luck with yer sweet pupps.

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Guest Freckles LaLa Mom
Lin, I used to think it would be an good experience working at an animal shelter. After reading your post I realize I wouldn't be able to handle it. It would be like working at a prison where everyone is innocent and good, but all are on death row with just days to live. Its really sad.

 

 

not everyone

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Guest LJS1993
What makes you think they aren't? Ever been around the adoption community?

ETA: Hey--you edited your post after I responded to it--no fair! Now my response doesn't make sense...

 

 

I work with children all the time, so I know plenty about the adoption community. I just hope those who are so passionate about canines share the same passion for humans. That is what I meant by my post. Go ahead and edit yours so it does make sense then.

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Lin, I used to think it would be an good experience working at an animal shelter. After reading your post I realize I wouldn't be able to handle it. It would be like working at a prison where everyone is innocent and good, but all are on death row with just days to live. Its really sad.

 

Just an aside but I hear this all the time and would just like to say that you'd be surprised what you can handle if you try. The people who work at shelters, and those who volunteer (myself included) can't always handle it either, but the alternative is for these dogs to have no sunshine, however limited, in their day. It would mean that nobody who cared would take them for walks....give them an affectionate pat...or hold them gently when it counts.

 

Maria

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I work with children all the time, so I know plenty about the adoption community. I just hope those who are so passionate about canines share the same passion for humans. That is what I meant by my post. Go ahead and edit yours so it does make sense then.

 

I think by and large, those with large compassion for animals often have equal or proportionately larger compassion for children. There are exceptions of course but I think the reverse is more often a reality, those with compassion for children don't always have it for animals in the same proportion. At least in my experience.

 

Maria

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Between 9 and 11 MILLION animals die every year in shelters and only you can stop it.

 

Lin,

Where did you come up with this figure?

According to statistics from the HSUS this exceeds the total number of dogs and cats entering shelters by several million as of 2006.

The HSUS estimates between 3-4 million cats and dogs are euthanized each year by shelters and an equal number of 3-4 million are being adopted from shelters.

There seems to be other conflicting statistics in the statement that you posted as well.

I by no means am slighting your attempt to point out that there is pet overpopulation problem that exsist in this country, I agree that there is and it needs to be addressed.

Education is the key and the pet over population problem is sad enough without inflating numbers for shock value.

 

Animal shelters are not evil institutions,they provide a valuble service to the community.It is the community that will ultimately determine if it's shelters are used for the proper reason or not.

 

Just my opinion

 

 

 

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I just hope those who are so passionate about canines share the same passion for humans.

 

Why? Why can't people just be passionate about what they're passionate about? I agree with Maria that people in general tend to be more passionate about their own species and more indifferent to other species, but so what if they're not? There are lots of people who aren't passionate about anything.

 

BTW, I didn't see LJS's original unedited post, but in general it IS unfair to edit your post in any significant way after someone else has responded to it.

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Guest LJS1993
Why? Why can't people just be passionate about what they're passionate about? I agree with Maria that people in general tend to be more passionate about their own species and more indifferent to other species, but so what if they're not? There are lots of people who aren't passionate about anything.

 

BTW, I didn't see LJS's original unedited post, but in general it IS unfair to edit your post in any significant way after someone else has responded to it.

 

 

I shall delete my first post then. However I feel I have a right to edit my thread if I feel I have been grossly misunderstood or have not explained my point of view properly. Either way my statement was merely a comment about the passion which exists within this thread. Can we now move forward?

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I just wanted to mention that my wife has been teaching obedience classes for the last 25 years and also teaches Pet- companion classes.

 

Every week there is someone new who wants to breed, has to breed, because their dog is the best doggy in the world and they want another.

Or as the original poster mentioned, this was an accident.

 

After 25 years of this, she still is compassionate, soft spoken, and kind to these people, that is the only way they will really listen, and she really gets her message across. I know, I've watched, listened and learned.

 

I know it's upsetting for rescue people to hear that. We have done our share of helping with a rescue organization, and we have heard it all to.

It's very sad and frustrating. Getting mad at them doesn't help.....at all. When we get frustrated we take a brake, nothing wrong with that.

 

I also remember myself of 40 years ago thinking the best dogs were " AKC farm raised" People still come in to class with those same thoughts, I have to pause and bite my tongue and remember myself....

 

My only message here, if you can't respond to someone asking for help with kindness, step away from the computer, I don't think they will listen otherwise.

 

I don't bother much with message boards too much, but have a broken ankle and I'm board.

 

David.

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I shall delete my first post then. However I feel I have a right to edit my thread if I feel I have been grossly misunderstood or have not explained my point of view properly. Either way my statement was merely a comment about the passion which exists within this thread. Can we now move forward?

 

Sure, we can move on, but I don't want to leave you with a misunderstanding. Deleting a post after someone has responded to it is just as hard on the discussion as altering it. You can edit as much as you want before someone has replied, but after they've replied, the way to deal with a gross misunderstanding or a failure to have explained your point of view properly is with another, clarifying post. I often edit my own posts because I don't think I've said something as well as I should have (all too often!), but if I find someone has posted in the meantime replying to the stuff I changed, I restore it to what I originally said and then post again in response to their post to explain better what I really meant.

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Sorry to make a small point that is somewhat off point, but I really hope that you, as the manager of a shelter knows where the carcasses go. If they just "go" somewhere, chances are they are being dumped somewhere, and you can be held culpable. Secondly, appropriate euthanasia consists of first a sedative, and then the euthanol.

Julie

 

Ugh. Sherry, you should read this:

 

 

I am posting this (and it is long) because I think our society needs a huge “Wake-up” call. As a shelter manager, I am going to share a little insight with you all...a view from the inside if you will. First off, this is a forum to for adoption and/or rehoming as clearly stated in the rules. All of you breeders/sellers on craigslist should not only be flagged (and I hope the good people on craigslist will continue to do so with blind fury), but you should be made to work in the “back” of an animal shelter for just one day. Maybe if you saw the life drain from a few sad, lost, confused eyes, you would change your mind about breeding and selling to people you don’t even know…that puppy you just sold will most likely end up in my shelter when it’s not a cute little puppy anymore. So how would you feel if you knew that there’s about a 90% chance that dog will never walk out of the shelter it is going to be dumped at? Purebred or not! About 50% of all of the dogs that are “owner surrenders” or “strays”, that come into my shelter are purebred dogs. The most common excuses I hear are; “We are moving and we can’t take our dog (or cat).” Really? Where are you moving too that doesn’t allow pets? Or they say “The dog got bigger than we thought it would”. How big did you think a German Shepherd would get? “We don’t have time for her…”. Really? I work a 10-12 hour day and still have time for my 6 dogs! “She’s tearing up our yard…”. How about making her a part of your family? They always tell me “We just don’t want to have to stress about finding a place for her…we know she’ll get adopted, she’s a good dog”. Odds are your pet won’t get adopted & how stressful do you think being in a shelter is? Well, let me tell you…your pet has 72 hours to find a new family from the moment you drop it off…sometimes a little longer if the shelter isn’t full and your dog manages to stay completely healthy…if it sniffles, it dies. Your pet will be confined to a small run/kennel in a room with about 25 other barking or crying animals. It will have to relieve itself where it eats and sleeps. It will be depressed and it will cry constantly for the family that abandoned it. If your pet is lucky, I will have enough volunteers in that day to take him/her for a walk. If I don’t, your pet won’t get any attention besides having a bowl of food slid under the kennel door and the waste sprayed out of its pen with a high-powered hose. If your dog is big, black or any of the “Bully” breeds (pit bull, rottie, mastiff, etc…) it was pretty much dead when you walked it through the front door. Those dogs just don’t get adopted. If your dog doesn’t get adopted within its 72 hours and the shelter is full, it will be destroyed. If the shelter isn’t full and your dog is good enough, and of a desirable enough breed…it may get a stay of execution…not for long though. Most get very kennel protective after about a week and are destroyed for showing aggression…even the sweetest dogs will turn in this environment. If your pet makes it over all of those hurdles…chances are it will get kennel cough or an upper respiratory infection and will be destroyed because shelters just don’t have the funds to pay for even a $100 treatment. Here’s a little euthanasia 101 for those of you that have never witnessed a perfectly healthy, scared animal being “put-down”. First, your pet will be taken from its kennel on a leash…they always look like they think they are going for a walk…happy, wagging their tails. Until they get to “The Room”, every one of them freaks out and puts on the breaks when we get to the door…it must smell like death or they can feel the sad souls that are left in there, it’s strange, but it happens with every one of them. Your dog or cat will be restrained, held down by 1 or 2 vet techs depending on the size and how freaked out they are. Then a euthanasia tech or a vet will start the process…they will find a vein in the front leg and inject a lethal dose of the “pink stuff”. Hopefully your pet doesn’t panic from being restrained and jerk…I’ve seen the needles tear out of a leg and been covered with the resulting blood and deafened by the yelps and screams. They all don’t just “go to sleep”, sometimes spasm for a while, gasp for air and defecate on themselves. When it all ends, your pets corpse will be stacked like firewood in a large freezer in the back with all of the other animals that were killed…waiting to be picked up like garbage. What happens next? Cremated? Taken to the dump? Rendered into pet food? You’ll never know and it probably won’t even cross your mind…it was just an animal and you can always buy another one right?

 

I hope that those of you that have read this are bawling your eyes out and can’t get the pictures out of your head…I do everyday on the way home from work. I hate my job, I hate that it exists & I hate that it will always be there unless you people make some changes and realize that the lives you are affecting go much farther than the pets you dump at a shelter. Between 9 and 11 MILLION animals die every year in shelters and only you can stop it. I do my best to save every life I can but rescues are always full, and there are more animals coming in everyday than there are homes.

 

My point to all of this…DON’T BREED OR BUY WHILE SHELTER PETS DIE!

Hate me or flag me if you want to…the truth hurts and reality is what it is…I just hope I maybe changed one persons mind about breeding their dog, taking their loving pet to a shelter, or buying a dog. I hope that someone will walk into my shelter and say “I saw this thing on craigslist and it made me want adopt”…that would make it all worth it.

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Guest WoobiesMom

David, I wish you'd post an example of what tactful reply your wife would give to someone intent on breeding their super doggie. I've run into a couple of these at the dog park and I'm always at a loss for what to say. Usually, when I bring up the number of dogs in shelters, etc., their response is always "Oh, I'd make sure they went to good homes and only charge oh, about $200-$300, rather than $650-$1000, like those other ones you see in the paper."

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David, I wish you'd post an example of what tactful reply your wife would give to someone intent on breeding their super doggie. I've run into a couple of these at the dog park and I'm always at a loss for what to say.

 

 

I too would love to have a not too lengthy, effective responsive (one I can memorize!) to people who want to breed their wonderful dog.

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Secondly, appropriate euthanasia consists of first a sedative, and then the euthanol.

 

Sadly there are many "shelters" in various parts of the country (or at least here in NC) that don't use appropriate euthanasis. Some still euthanize with "gas." I put gas in quotes because in actuality what they do is put all the animals in a box/airtight enclosure and then run exhaust in. As long as Lin is talking about putting animals to death and the process by which that's done, I feel a need to point out that in poorer and rural areas, there are other "options" for euthansia, none of which involve a sedative first or a needle and none of which are very humane, IMO.

 

J.

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Back in 1998, I once went to volunteer at a Humane Society, in Fremont, Nebraska.

 

They told me that their method of euthanasia, was that they stabbed the animals in the chest with an empty syringe, until they died. NOT very humane if you ask me!!!!

 

I then had a "talk" with someone higher up, and since then have been under new management.

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