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Buddy's adverse reaction to pre-med sedation?


kevmarshall
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We took our 14 year old Buddy to the vet as he had bad breath and was having trouble chewing.

 

We asked for a general check up and were told he was strong for his age but a tooth abscess needed an operation the next day. He was to have them all cleaned at the same time.

 

Less than an hour after his pre-med, the vet phoned to say he could not do the operation as Buddy had had an adverse reaction to the sedation and collapsed. He never got as far as the anaesthetic. Buddy was given oxygen and was put on a drip and was kept in for 24 hours.

 

Antibiotics have cleared to abscess for now but it could flare up again.

 

Buddy weighs 26kg and the vet said he only gave the pre-med for a 15kg dog because of his age. He couldn’t understand his bad reaction.

 

I have since spoken to the former show breeder (Ravensliegh) of Buddy’s line and she says it is common knowledge that collies can react badly to pre-med and going straight for anaesthesia would probably have been the best way to go.

 

As it is, we have paid £70 just to put our poor old lad through 24 hours of misery.

 

Can anyone throw any light on the problems Border Collies can have with sedation?

 

Shouldn’t the vet have been aware of this?

 

What action if any should we take?

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Find out what kind of sedative he had. If it was Propofol, this is known to cause respiratory arrest if titrated to quickly. And no, I have not heard of this being a common reaction in Collies. There are breeds who can suffer Hypotension under anesthesia- Boxers, but I do not know anything in regard to Collies.

Julie

 

We took our 14 year old Buddy to the vet as he had bad breath and was having trouble chewing.

 

We asked for a general check up and were told he was strong for his age but a tooth abscess needed an operation the next day. He was to have them all cleaned at the same time.

 

Less than an hour after his pre-med, the vet phoned to say he could not do the operation as Buddy had had an adverse reaction to the sedation and collapsed. He never got as far as the anaesthetic. Buddy was given oxygen and was put on a drip and was kept in for 24 hours.

 

Antibiotics have cleared to abscess for now but it could flare up again.

 

Buddy weighs 26kg and the vet said he only gave the pre-med for a 15kg dog because of his age. He couldn’t understand his bad reaction.

 

I have since spoken to the former show breeder (Ravensliegh) of Buddy’s line and she says it is common knowledge that collies can react badly to pre-med and going straight for anaesthesia would probably have been the best way to go.

 

As it is, we have paid £70 just to put our poor old lad through 24 hours of misery.

 

Can anyone throw any light on the problems Border Collies can have with sedation?

 

Shouldn’t the vet have been aware of this?

 

What action if any should we take?

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If it was Propofol, this is known to cause respiratory arrest if titrated to quickly.

 

And this, apparently, was what happened to Tikkle 3 weeks ago, but she also went into full cardiac arrest. Many thousands of dollars later, she is doing better than expected. So sorry Buddy had to go through this, and I am so relieved that he is OK. What a horrid scare!

Anna

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Find out what kind of sedative he had. If it was Propofol, this is known to cause respiratory arrest if titrated to quickly. And no, I have not heard of this being a common reaction in Collies. There are breeds who can suffer Hypotension under anesthesia- Boxers, but I do not know anything in regard to Collies.

Julie

 

Thanks for your swift replies. No idea what the drug was but it was injected while waited as I didn't want Buddy to be stressed when I left him. It just took a couple of seconds to inject.

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My Sara went into seizures the first time she had pre-op sedation; fortunately my vet has bc's and was monitoring her closely - and controlled the reaction immediately - and this was almost 13 yrs ago! Since then, she does not receive pre-op sedation. My vet allows me to hold Sara while they put a mask on her and administer anethesia slowly until she goes to sleep, then they intubate her and proceed. Luckily she doesn't fight the mask. Obviously this is more time consuming for the vet staff [and may be a little old fashioned] but my vet feels that it is the safest way.

 

Glad Buddy is okay - and hope his abcessed tooth got taken care of!

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