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Nancy in Ontario

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Everything posted by Nancy in Ontario

  1. Mark: This moment of 'control' as you say, isn't that supposed to be the lift?? This question really shows my ignorance I guess..... I've always wondered and have tried to watch closely when this moment of control happens too. Nancy in Ontario
  2. Really beautiful photo's. Thanks for sharing. Looks like a lovely place for a trial and a clinic, minus the snow of course! I have been to a couple of DS clinics and I think he is a wonderful teacher. Nancy in Ontario
  3. Hi Lauren, I would put money on sheltie. Not all shelties have pinched noses....some are quite square faced like your little guy. And I've seen that colouring in a couple of shelties. Or he may indeed be a bc cross. Either way, he is an adorable little guy. Seriously hugable! And, I love that little bumper thingy. What a great idea! Nancy in Ontario
  4. I would suggest if you want to help this lady, then SPEAK TO HER DIRECTLY instead of using a third party as indicated in your first post. It's awful nice the 3rd party wants to help, but how much of this information you're receiving is actually the 3rd party's input, and how much belongs to the owner? Until you hear directly from the owner, all this 'what should I do, I think you should do this' is just alot of preaching to the choir isn't it? Nancy in Ontario
  5. Hi Brenda, I think you are wise to be cautious around a water way (stream/creek/river etc) for obvious reasons of flooding. I like your idea of researching with the county though. On the other hand, having a creek can be a bonus. I've lived with a creek and presently with a pond. With a flowing waterway on your property, you have to be careful with water rights. (can you divert water to your barn? etc.) And I know here in Ontario, we need to fence off access to flowing waterways in order to preserve shoreline (fish habitat etc) and to stop the contamination of water with livestock
  6. I enjoyed watching this (only the winning run) and thanks for sending the link. Looks very much like a typical ranch dog course. Trying not to be too judgemental, especially without knowing the requirements of the course, but the dog does seem a might mechanical in it's relationship to the stock. Kept looking at the handler whilst on the field. (mind you, the handler loved his whistle eh?) It was fun to watch the penning work. Although it seems a little rough on the stock.....but it is interesting to see the dogs up on the sheep backs. I've seen the necessity of this stunt first h
  7. [quote name='Wendy V' timestamp='1297685072' post='382444' I think there is very little work for the sheepdog on a small farm. Hi Wendy, I'm not sure I agree with this sentence. Compared to trailing 600 sheep every day, I guess a small farm has smaller needs. I have a 'small' farm but like you consider myself a producer as it is my only income. (hubby works off farm and pays mortgage, but my income tax says farmer) I can unequivocally say that I could not do my job without my dog(s). Producers in my area tend to invest thousands of dollars in equipment to handle sheep.
  8. [quote name='Wendy V' timestamp='1297685072' post='382444' I think there is very little work for the sheepdog on a small farm. Hi Wendy, I'm not sure I agree with this sentence. Compared to trailing 600 sheep every day, I guess a small farm has smaller needs. I have a 'small' farm but like you consider myself a producer as it is my only income. (hubby works off farm and pays mortgage, but my income tax says farmer) I can unequivocally say that I could not do my job without my dog(s). Producers in my area tend to invest thousands of dollars in equipment to handle sheep.
  9. I believe this has already been stated, but thought I'd bring it up again..... If you want to educate farmers, you need to go where they are. Hanging out at sheep trials won't often put you in touch with the folks who need a dog. If you have sheep, join your local producers group and get the word out that you use dogs in your operation. I can't tell you how many fellow producers come up and ask about my dogs simply because I am available to them. They come by and ask to watch, or call to ask questions because they know me as a producer, not as a trialer. Just had a fellow here yeste
  10. Right! And if you do the math at $1000 a pup, that's more than I make from my lambs every year! So they can be a 'breeder' full time. Sheesh! Nancy in Ontario
  11. I will second the post about enzymes (that's really all that "Beano" is I believe) Go for a product for dogs though, not people. Nancy in Ontario
  12. So I received my Virginia Finals cd's this week and have promised myself to watch 3 runs a day. What a great treat to myself and how nice it is to watch the finals this way. I did manage to log into the finals for a couple of runs while they happened, but this way I can savour each run at a more leisurely pace. Thanx to those who arranged the whole thing. regards, Nancy in Ontario
  13. I agree Charlie, and have a hard time maligning breeds. I think there are definate character traits in breeds or else why have more than one breed, but how sheep are handled may have more to do with what they expect at 'handling'. That said, I have run across a miserable suffolk or two. Mark, a friend of mine has a beautiful flock of Romneys and they are fun to work...yes slow/plodding and touchy, but manageable. We are eastern also. Nancy in Ontario
  14. Uh....Bill forgot to mention his usual winter gear is shorts....! It must be a real cold day when he dresses as he explained. I tend to layer, cotton turtleneck, jean or heavy cotton shirt, down vest and then my old Helly Hansen lightweight parka. My husband bought me this HH when we lived in the lower Mainland of BC and I was a rowing coach. I lived in this coat on the water in all weather. It was warm and dry, had lots of pockets, zippered both ways and had breathable vents. It came east with us and I just add more layers to it in the winter. After about 15 yrs it's lost it's
  15. Not so much a pro or con, but a suggestion: Decide what your goals are. If you are keen about trialing soon, then having someone else start your dog may be the right choice. I've read alot of good advice here on ways of doing that right. If you need a right-hand-dog to work on your farm, then buying a trained dog or sending off a pup is also an economic and efficient way of getting that right-hand to start work sooner. On the other hand, if you prefer the 'journey' to the post, then get out there with a good trainer, and do it all yourself! My opinion only but it's way
  16. I'll add my thanks Pearse. Last year I was able to attend the Finals and had a blast. Met up with some old friends, made some new ones and I learned a great deal. Reading your blog brought back all the excitement and I can't tell you how much I appreciated you sitting down each day and putting your experience to words. As far as joining the HA to watch videos......well, I can't watch videos on dial-up so I would have to say no. Not only that but I think joining an association should be more about 'us' than 'me'. Much like what Sue R. suggests. Join because you believe in the Ass
  17. We keep an open shed and small paddock for about-to-lamb-ewes. We just build a nice pack on dirt/gravel with wheat straw and muck out once a year. Sounds nasty but the pack gives off warmth and it stays dry through all but the worst wet. And then we just go through more straw. Fortunately, there is usually alot of wheat straw available (most years but this is an exception.....sigh) Nancy in Ontario
  18. Yes, we also pay a small 'tax' to our provincial sheep board. ($1.45 per head - or close to it) It sounds like you have the same problems we do here in the north of you. Although they have been trying to address infrastructure since the BSE trouble. It has helped with more plants becoming federally inspected, allowing many of the larger chains of grocery stores to buy our lamb. Has made a difference in my pocket I think. Prices remain high partly because of this (IMO). I wonder how much it costs you for your government to step in a buy your surplus? I don't begin to understand
  19. Oh, okay. Thanks for that info Bill. I was unaware of this (not sure what to call it) 'thing' your government does. Not sure what to make of it either! Nanc in Ontario
  20. Where I live in southern Ontario, lamb prices remain high..... just shipped some lambs at $1.51. Culls are lower now than earlier in the year (my guess is high volume but would have to check) at only $0.90. I last shipped culls in June at $1.08. (an alltime high for me!) Hay prices are very high here too because of the drought we've had. Although not as bad as some places, we have been feeding out our winter hay stores since August. We are good for a few more months but will have to buy in by Feb. Um, something I wanted to ask regarding the original post....your government buys
  21. We also have little in the way of storage with only room for a ton in our lean-to. We feed both small squares (during lambing) and round bales. We've stored both outside and use old truck tires to keep the hay off the ground. We bought an old tarp used by transport trucks (heavy duty) and have to secure it very well. As long as the hay is dry, is kept off the ground and the tarp is weatherproof, we've had pretty good luck keeping it outside. The problem comes when there is lots of snow and digging out to get to the hay! (okay, that's only happened once) Now we trade for hay from a ne
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