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Nancy in Ontario

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    Dunnville, Ontario, Canada

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  1. Mark: This moment of 'control' as you say, isn't that supposed to be the lift?? This question really shows my ignorance I guess..... I've always wondered and have tried to watch closely when this moment of control happens too. Nancy in Ontario
  2. Really beautiful photo's. Thanks for sharing. Looks like a lovely place for a trial and a clinic, minus the snow of course! I have been to a couple of DS clinics and I think he is a wonderful teacher. Nancy in Ontario
  3. Hi Lauren, I would put money on sheltie. Not all shelties have pinched noses....some are quite square faced like your little guy. And I've seen that colouring in a couple of shelties. Or he may indeed be a bc cross. Either way, he is an adorable little guy. Seriously hugable! And, I love that little bumper thingy. What a great idea! Nancy in Ontario
  4. I would suggest if you want to help this lady, then SPEAK TO HER DIRECTLY instead of using a third party as indicated in your first post. It's awful nice the 3rd party wants to help, but how much of this information you're receiving is actually the 3rd party's input, and how much belongs to the owner? Until you hear directly from the owner, all this 'what should I do, I think you should do this' is just alot of preaching to the choir isn't it? Nancy in Ontario
  5. Hi Brenda, I think you are wise to be cautious around a water way (stream/creek/river etc) for obvious reasons of flooding. I like your idea of researching with the county though. On the other hand, having a creek can be a bonus. I've lived with a creek and presently with a pond. With a flowing waterway on your property, you have to be careful with water rights. (can you divert water to your barn? etc.) And I know here in Ontario, we need to fence off access to flowing waterways in order to preserve shoreline (fish habitat etc) and to stop the contamination of water with livestock waste. There was a terrible tragedy in Walkerton a number of years back and Ontario farmers have been paying for it ever since. If you can divert a stream, there are ingenious ways to do so. The internet is full of sites with really bright ideas. We have a pond (30' x 60' by maybe 15' deep) that I allow the sheep to drink from. It is only a supplementary watering hole and used only in a rotation of grazing. I know folks who have put in a pump system in their pond, feeding the barn, but I haven't done that with ours. (thought alot about it though) It also makes a difference if the pond has a source.... Ours does not as it was dug when we built our house. If there is an underground source to your pond, I wouldn't hesitate to tap into it as a watering source for the barn! If it is a stagnant pond as is ours, you would have to put in a special (can't remember what they are called) type of filter box in the bottom of the pond I think. And, depending on the size of the pond you may run out of water! We almost did a few years back when having a drought. Hmmmm I seem to be rambling a bit so better quit while I'm ahead. Have fun dreaming and figuring things out. That's half the fun of getting your own place. And it doesn't stop when you move in either! Nanc in Ontario
  6. I enjoyed watching this (only the winning run) and thanks for sending the link. Looks very much like a typical ranch dog course. Trying not to be too judgemental, especially without knowing the requirements of the course, but the dog does seem a might mechanical in it's relationship to the stock. Kept looking at the handler whilst on the field. (mind you, the handler loved his whistle eh?) It was fun to watch the penning work. Although it seems a little rough on the stock.....but it is interesting to see the dogs up on the sheep backs. I've seen the necessity of this stunt first hand though. Many years ago BSD (before sheep and dogs) I spent a few months on a sheep farm in New Zealand working with a big flock of 2000..... Moving 800 ewes from one pasture to the next, through an 18ft gate, means the leading sheep walk through and stop to graze a few feet inside the new paddock. This causes a huge traffic jam, so one of the dogs jumps up on backs to push the lead sheep ahead some. Very cool to see how useful this is. It's interesting how trials evolve around the strengths of the dogs and needs of the shepherds..... Nancy in Ontario
  7. [quote name='Wendy V' timestamp='1297685072' post='382444' I think there is very little work for the sheepdog on a small farm. Hi Wendy, I'm not sure I agree with this sentence. Compared to trailing 600 sheep every day, I guess a small farm has smaller needs. I have a 'small' farm but like you consider myself a producer as it is my only income. (hubby works off farm and pays mortgage, but my income tax says farmer) I can unequivocally say that I could not do my job without my dog(s). Producers in my area tend to invest thousands of dollars in equipment to handle sheep. I can do most of the same thing with the dogs. Yes, I have some pens set up...but I can sort off my sheep in as short a time with the dog, as those with equipment. I may not be sorting or trailing sheep all day, but I do it enough that the dog is needed. Every chore I do (other than tractor things) is ably helped by the dog. I've learned the hard way that moving sheep without the dog is usually impossible. Even with a grain bucket. (obviously the sheep have learned to move for the dog....wish I could remember that when I think I can do it myself) I do hear some producers say the same thing....that they don't have the work for a dog. I don't know what to say other than if I don't have a dog I'm always cursing myself for not bringing one along...... Thousands of dollars in equipment versus a few thousand for a trained dog....... I think Pearse says it most wisely..........you get to take the dog home with you.... Nanc
  8. [quote name='Wendy V' timestamp='1297685072' post='382444' I think there is very little work for the sheepdog on a small farm. Hi Wendy, I'm not sure I agree with this sentence. Compared to trailing 600 sheep every day, I guess a small farm has smaller needs. I have a 'small' farm but like you consider myself a producer as it is my only income. (hubby works off farm and pays mortgage, but my income tax says farmer) I can unequivocally say that I could not do my job without my dog(s). Producers in my area tend to invest thousands of dollars in equipment to handle sheep. I can do most of the same thing with the dogs. Yes, I have some pens set up...but I can sort off my sheep in as short a time with the dog, as those with equipment. I may not be sorting or trailing sheep all day, but I do it enough that the dog is needed. Every chore I do (other than tractor things) is ably helped by the dog. I've learned the hard way that moving sheep without the dog is usually impossible. Even with a grain bucket. (obviously the sheep have learned to move for the dog....wish I could remember that when I think I can do it myself) I do hear some producers say the same thing....that they don't have the work for a dog. I don't know what to say other than if I don't have a dog I'm always cursing myself for not bringing one along...... Thousands of dollars in equipment versus a few thousand for a trained dog....... I think Pearse says it most wisely..........you get to take the dog home with you.... Nanc
  9. I believe this has already been stated, but thought I'd bring it up again..... If you want to educate farmers, you need to go where they are. Hanging out at sheep trials won't often put you in touch with the folks who need a dog. If you have sheep, join your local producers group and get the word out that you use dogs in your operation. I can't tell you how many fellow producers come up and ask about my dogs simply because I am available to them. They come by and ask to watch, or call to ask questions because they know me as a producer, not as a trialer. Just had a fellow here yesterday talking about buying a border collie to help on his farm. He has a small flock, about a hundred ewes but also runs about 30 cows and wants a dog that will work both. Spent quite some time talking about it and I was happy to hear that he was serious about buying a dog with working parents. Now he feels it isn't necessary that he buys off Big Hat A or B, but that he buys from someone who is working their dogs every day in the same sort of operation he has. I couldn't agree more with him. I'll help him all I can with finding a pup and getting good training..... So there are plenty of opportunities for us to help inform the farmer/rancher. Just need to put ourselves out there and be available.
  10. Right! And if you do the math at $1000 a pup, that's more than I make from my lambs every year! So they can be a 'breeder' full time. Sheesh! Nancy in Ontario
  11. I will second the post about enzymes (that's really all that "Beano" is I believe) Go for a product for dogs though, not people. Nancy in Ontario
  12. So I received my Virginia Finals cd's this week and have promised myself to watch 3 runs a day. What a great treat to myself and how nice it is to watch the finals this way. I did manage to log into the finals for a couple of runs while they happened, but this way I can savour each run at a more leisurely pace. Thanx to those who arranged the whole thing. regards, Nancy in Ontario
  13. I agree Charlie, and have a hard time maligning breeds. I think there are definate character traits in breeds or else why have more than one breed, but how sheep are handled may have more to do with what they expect at 'handling'. That said, I have run across a miserable suffolk or two. Mark, a friend of mine has a beautiful flock of Romneys and they are fun to work...yes slow/plodding and touchy, but manageable. We are eastern also. Nancy in Ontario
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