Jump to content
BC Boards

silhouettestable

Registered Users
  • Posts

    974
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by silhouettestable

  1. You can find lots of suppliers of booties if you go to Sled Dog Central and check out the equipment link, or some of the banner ads on the site. Most mushers will use booties at some point and they need ones that stay on while running. You could either browse the various suppliers sites to see what is available, or go onto SDC Talk and ask which types they recommend. The other thing many mushers do to toughen up the feet is feed a zinc supplement, usually either a powder that's added to the feed (something like Zin-Pro), or in tablet form from the drug store (I've heard it recommended to feed the zinc gluconate tablets, not the chelated zinc). There are tons of discussions on feet, foot care and foot injuries if you do a search on that forum.
  2. Does she like water? If she does maybe she'd enjoy dock diving. With my dogs I've tried a little of this, a little of that, (agility, disc, playing around with flyball and dock diving) but our main sport is sledding and they love it. Don't know where you're located, if you get snow or not but if you do and you're a skier, skijoring may be an option. In the race circuit I compete on there is now a 1-dog and 2-dog skijor class at every race we attend. Or, if there's no snow where you are there's always scootering and bikejoring too. There are dryland races but you could also do it just for fun.
  3. Do you know if it's just behavioural, or are there any hormonal changes too that would affect egg production? She's old and winter's coming so she's not laying now anyhow but I'm just curious. Also, do you know if it's more likely to happen with hens that are used to living with a rooster in the coop and would it be less likely to happen with young chicks that have never lived with a rooster? I recently bought a dozen chicks that are now a week old and in my basement under a heat lamp that will end up "roosterless" unless freebie #13 turns out to be a rooster. I've had chickens for years but I've always had one or more roosters around. This is a new one on me.
  4. Has anyone ever seen (heard) this before? We have this old black hen that for a while now has been acting a little "odd". She hasn't raised any chicks but if I scatter any grain, bread, vegetables or anything she'll pick up pieces and cluck like she's calling her chicks, or like a rooster would do. A few different times I was certain I heard a crowing noise which I thought odd when my meat chickens were too young to crow. I did used to have rooster in the coop but it's been months since he died, (maybe even a year now, I don't exactly remember) and I haven't replaced him. Back in the late spring/early summer I lost a bunch of my hens to a coon and now only have 3 left. We do get an assortment of noises coming from our coop what with the chickens, turkeys, ducks and peacock, but since the meat chickens are now all gone there is nothing in there that should crow. Well today I was out there working on something and the old black hen opens her mouth and..."COCKADOODLEDOOOOOO!" She did it a couple of times. I have never, ever heard a hen crow before.
  5. I used to do a lot of trail riding with my dogs along. That was years ago when I did more riding and before I had border collies. I had a couple of rough collies and a hound that would come along and loved to go for a good run. It helps a lot to know that the horses are not bothered by dogs at all. Mine was fine whether the dogs were running in front, beside, behind, he didn't care. He would even put up with the hound leaping up to his face barking and yelping, which she did whenever we stopped moving. I don't do much riding anymore and where I live now there would be more road riding to get to the trails so I haven't taken dogs along with me for quite a while. I'm not sure if I were to try it with the border collies if they'd want to "work" the horses and I think I'd probably want them to learn to go in front, rather than wearing at the heels or getting the idea of chasing.
  6. Do these words ever actually come out of any man's mouth other than in jest?
  7. While my dh has absolutely nothing to do with my dogs other than giving them an occasional scratch or pat, he is a terrible enabler. If I mention anything about a friend having a litter he'll say something like "so I guess you're getting another one". If I get one puppy but talk about the others he'll say "why didn't you get 2?" or if I have choosen what I think is best for our purposes, fall in love with another and take 2 but our daughter also liked the runt "Why didn't you get them all?" Much as I love raising puppies I have to be the voice of reason for myself or I'd have an even larger pack. Still...when our daughter is ready to run her own 4-dog team, I just might need two more dogs so we both have full teams Luckily dh doesn't seem much to mind picking dog hair out of his food, having it blowing all over the house, having to step over dogs and toys, and having to share the bed, though occasionally he grumbles when a bunch of the dogs all jump on the bed and wake him up.
  8. I don't know if the ones used by mushers would be suitable, as they're intended more for winter use (though ventilation would certainly be a consideration for anyone running dryland events, they just wouldn't be doing it in the heat of summer). If you want to check them out go to Sled Dog Central and browse the classifieds (link at the top of the page), and also check the list of links on the left side for "Equipment and Supplies"
  9. Awww, what a cutie. She does look pretty smooth right now. Maybe she'll be more like my Dru. He was a smoother puppy but wavy on his back and almost curly on his tail. He's just turned a year and he is now pretty smooth but with a bit of longer hair on the back of his back legs. It's the coarser kind of hair like a smooth coat will have. Storm has very fine silky hair (which is pretty but can mat up a bit when he swims a lot if I'm not careful) Storm hates to be groomed so I'm always checking him for the beginning of mats this time of year so I can deal with them before they get too big. In the winter he doesn't get them, apparently it's the swimming that does it to him.
  10. My Storm was a fluffy pup, then around 4 months as he was loosing the puppy fur he got a lot smoother. By 5-6 months it was coming in long again. He's kind of wavy on the back. Before his coat grew in to the full length it is now I nicknamed him "Fluffybutt". Even when the most of his coat was smoother he always had fluffy ears and waves on his tail. I'll see if I can dig up some pictures of his different stages for you to see. Here they are, sorry some are pretty poor quality. Those were taken with an older camera that wasn't very good: 10 weeks 3 months 4 months around 6 months Almost 2 1/2 years, June 2009 Storm's mom and dad are both fairly smooth coated, don't know where he gets his from.
  11. Sounds like she might. How old is she?
  12. If you're considering doing a transport to somewhere further away, and are willing to consider Canada maybe try contacting Sharron at Moosonee Puppy Rescue to see if she has room. She sometimes has adult dogs but deals mainly with pups that are transported down from remote areas in Northern Ontario. She also has brought in pups rescued from mills in Quebec and she went down to New Orleans and brought up a bunch of puppies that were scheduled for euthanasia in an overcrowded shelter a few months after Hurricane Katrina. My Thunder and Flash came from that bunch.
  13. To keep it dry you could always try some of those rubber booties. They're like little balloons you just pull on. Supposed to be disposable but I've been told they can often be used a few times before you need to put on a new set.
  14. A good source for information about dog-powered sports and links to suppliers is Sled Dog Central Personally I wouldn't be brave enough to try blading with my dogs, I crash too much even skijoring. I'll stick with my sled or dryland cart ETA: A shortie style harness designed for skijoring would probably be a good choice for blading with. I'm not sure how many companies sell them but you can check them out at AKKO Sports (their JH model), that's where I buy all my harnesses. They're great quality and really good people to deal with.
  15. I used to let my dogs have corncobs until I saw a show on Animal Planet where a dog was being operated on to remove a foreign body. It was a chunk of corn cob. Sometimes I'll still let mine nibble at the cob while I hold it, but only if they're carefully using just their front teeth to nibble it. If they try to bite pieces off or take the whole thing it goes into the garbage. At one time I also used to take the cobs out to the chicken coop to let them pick over the cobs but the dogs go in there with me doing chores so I've stopped that as well.
  16. It should heal pretty quickly, they generally do. By Saturday the quick may have receded enough that even if the nail is split it may not hurt anymore. If it bled again because the surgical glue didn't hold just try some crazy glue. I've used it on split nails lots of times. I've even used little strips of duct tape wound around split nails before to patch them up and have not had to lay off training. One of the kid & mutt classes Lightning won with my daughter he had a taped nail. I debated whether to enter them or not but it wasn't bothering him so they did it and he was fine. I read on a sled dog message board about some kind of nail repair kit you can get, I'd like to find out more about that. It's supposed to be something that hardens on really well to build up the tips if they get too worn down or broken.
  17. I think my friends females are in that weight range but the male is more like 160 I think she said now. He's just over a year and he's massive. In the pictures on her site he's just a big baby, but even then he makes the one female look small in one shot. We used to have a couple of Great Danes, a brother and a sister. They were very tall Danes but had nowhere near the bulk of the male Anatolian. Our female weighed in the 130's and was leggier but not as solid as the female Anatolians. Her brother was close to 150 and again leggy but not nearly so thick as the Anatolian male. Our guy probably measured about 35"-36", not exactly sure. I know that by the time he was around 8 months old he had outgrown the crate we had borrowed for him. The door on it measured 33" square and if he backed up into the crate his withers would brush the top.
  18. Yeah and by the time you get to 7 and then 8 you barely even notice Wait a minute, dh didn't notice number 8 in our house until about 30 hours after I brought him home! Dh was out working or on call or something when I brought Dru home, and by the time he came home I was in bed and the room was dark with Dru all tucked up cozy and quiet in his crate beside my side of the bed. Dh was up early for work (before it was light out) and didn't come home until the evening. I was cracking up as he was petting the new addition without even noticing and he kept saying "What? What's so funny? What did I do?" It took him a few minutes to realize that he wasn't petting Rain.
  19. My friends have 3 Anatolians. There are pictures on their site Borders View Farm That part of their site hasn't been updated in a little while. The two dogs listed are both a little older now and bigger (the male is HUGE!), and they also now have the 3rd Anatolian.
  20. A 3 bedroom house isn't big enough to have 2 dogs? Oh dear. I'd better break the news to my eight that we need a larger house. Maybe one bedroom per dog, so that most of them don't all sleep on my bed? Guess I'd better go win a lottery so I can buy my dogs a mansion. Seriously, ours is a 1050 square foot home and 2 of the rooms are blocked off from the dogs (too many toys for them to get into in my daughter's bedroom and playroom). They don't care how many rooms there are, they are always wherever I am. Up to 6 of them at a time even follow me into the bathroom. Hmmm...maybe all I need is a house with a bigger bathroom I love my pack, I can't imagine ever having only 1 dog again. If you and your husband are both in agreement and you have the finances to do it...go for it!
  21. I've cross posted the information as well to another board. I also just came across some other sites that might be helpful to you. In case you have to register etc. it might be better for you to post the info there yourself so you can update or remove it as needed. They're not sites/boards I'm a member of. http://www.flealess.org/lostpets/index.html (you can post there but scroll down for more links) www.petfinder.com http://www.fidofinder.com/matches.php http://www.lostapet.org/ http://www.mycommunityinfo.ca/life/pets/online.asp
  22. My Flurry will sometimes take really long pees. In his case though it's just if he's been drinking a lot or holding it for a while, he doesn't seem to need to go frequently. Sometimes when I let him out into the yard he's more interested in playing, or in coming back in to play with one of the others inside and he ends up holding it for a while. When he finally does go he goes, and goes, and goes, and goes....taking a really long time and creating quite a lake around him. He's neutered and everything else with him is normal.
  23. What about a small bucket hung inside the crate? I've got a couple of small stainless steel buckets that have a hook on the side for hanging them up, plus they have a handle so I also put a clip on that (to make sure that the bucket doesn't get lifted and unhooked). If it's mounted high enough they can drink but not easily get feet in. I've also used a rabbit bottle, mounted on the outside of the crate with just the stainless steel spout sticking through. Worked great for most pups but I had one that was able to pull the spout right out of the neck of the bottle and then it leaked.
  24. One of mine is a red & white and people aren't always sure of what he is. With him though it's not so much his colour (or at least not only because of his colour), it's also his build. He's a HUGE dog for a border collie, very tall and very long, really solid bone structure. This is Flurry:
×
×
  • Create New...