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Billsmom

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About Billsmom

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  • Birthday 01/29/1953

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  1. Mojo, In response to your questions, Bill has had episodes over the years where he has had a number of "seizures" in a several day period. They appear to be related to stress, such as a female in heat. These are also times when he is off his feed, so we don't know if diet is a factor as well. He has never been put on medication as the seizures are mostly infrequent, and I have been hesitant to treat him for epilepsy when I have my doubts about this being epilepsy. It is frustrating to have the experts insist my boy is epilectic when they have never seen one of his seizures. I used to work in a veterinary clinic, and have been around a number of true epileptic dogs. I have also groomed a few dogs that had hypoglycemic episodes, and what Bill does is very different. Some of Bill's early episodes seemed to be exercise related, so I started to give him a hot dog prior to working stock, and that appeared to help. He is a very sensitive and intellegent dog, with a lot of noise sensitivity. He hates gun fire, even at a great distance, and thunder is very hard on him. He will not panic at these sounds, but he will take the sheep back to the pen, if he's out with them, and will ignore any commands until they are "safe". He will also push against my husband and I, and will try to herd us into the house. His actions when there is thunder or gun fire is very similiar to how he acts prior to a seizure. There have been a number of times when we think we may have prevented a seizure with a high calorie snack, but of course have no way of knowing for sure. If somebody is interested in studying this kind of seizure activity, I would be very interested in donating blood and in trying to videotape one of his "spells".
  2. Mojo, In response to your questions, Bill has had episodes over the years where he has had a number of "seizures" in a several day period. They appear to be related to stress, such as a female in heat. These are also times when he is off his feed, so we don't know if diet is a factor as well. He has never been put on medication as the seizures are mostly infrequent, and I have been hesitant to treat him for epilepsy when I have my doubts about this being epilepsy. It is frustrating to have the experts insist my boy is epilectic when they have never seen one of his seizures. I used to work in a veterinary clinic, and have been around a number of true epileptic dogs. I have also groomed a few dogs that had hypoglycemic episodes, and what Bill does is very different. Some of Bill's early episodes seemed to be exercise related, so I started to give him a hot dog prior to working stock, and that appeared to help. He is a very sensitive and intellegent dog, with a lot of noise sensitivity. He hates gun fire, even at a great distance, and thunder is very hard on him. He will not panic at these sounds, but he will take the sheep back to the pen, if he's out with them, and will ignore any commands until they are "safe". He will also push against my husband and I, and will try to herd us into the house. His actions when there is thunder or gun fire is very similiar to how he acts prior to a seizure. There have been a number of times when we think we may have prevented a seizure with a high calorie snack, but of course have no way of knowing for sure. If somebody is interested in studying this kind of seizure activity, I would be very interested in donating blood and in trying to videotape one of his "spells".
  3. Mojo, I read your posts with interest as I too have a Border Collie that exhibits a very similiar syndrome. My vet (who has never seen the incidents) believes my boy is suffering from epilepsy, but the siezures are not the same. Your discription of your dog's symptoms are nearly exactly what my Bill does, plus I have also found Nutrical to be help in shortening the episodes. Like you, I found the Chinook video, and also saw the similarity. My husband and I have owned Bill since puppyhood and he has had no injuries. He had his first siezure at a year and a half after heavy excersise on a warm day and we worried about heat stroke. Several times it's been when he has been off his feed, so we thought it might be hypoglycemia, especially since the nutrical seems to help, but his bloodwork is always normal. Bill is now nearly nine years old and has seizures two or three times a year. Like you, I keep trying to find a way to videotape an episode, but find myself holding him and comforting him. If I try to leave him, he struggles to follow, and you can see the panic in his eyes. He also seems to know when one of these seizures is about to occur as he will run to my husband or myself and be VERY clingy. It would certainly be a comfort to know what is really happening with him.
  4. I've had Australian Cattle Dogs born with that kind of bent tail, it happened in two unrelated litters. For the most part though, I think it is done just because it's tradition. Certain areas of the country seem to be into docking stockdog tails, and when I've asked why, I 'm told that that's the way you're supposed to do it. Having worked cattle with the Australian Cattle Dog (heeler) with tails, I do know that they really use that tail as a rudder, but I couldn't say that not having a tail would be that much of a handicap.
  5. I concur with most of the other posters in regard to getting proffesional help, but have confidence that a new enviorment may in and of itself work wonders. I purchased a started trial dog 7 years ago that had serious aggression issues, hence the bargain basement price. She is still with me and I have had to do very little, other than common sense, to make her a wonderful member of our family. She was known to have bitten several children, and about 10 adults, including the wife of her previous owner. Her seller had to but her in a crate for me, and she showed me her teeth all the way home when I'd look at her. Long story short, we just have never let her get in a position where she feels she can't escape. She loves kids, and when folks come to visit she is usually right there wanting to be petted. I do not let anybody mess with her while she is crated or in a run, as those are situations where she may show aggression. I am a relaxed individual, and when I have a dog on leash I expect good behavior, I don't tense up and worry. The dogs feel this lack of concern, and as a result they don't feel any threat. (I wish I could apply this principle a horseback, but nope, I see all the "boogers", and my tense seat tells the horse to be afraid too.) Border collies are smart enough that if you expect a behavior, that's what you'll get, good or bad!
  6. I live out here on the Llano Estacado, and I was wondering if anybody else deals with anything similar. My young 13 month old pup, who is doing some nice 100 yard outruns, will on occasion lock onto a train moving about 2.5 miles away. Trying to get him to look for his sheep is a pain, as he is sure that the movement he sees IS the sheep. I try to send him with the train at our back, or make sure that there is no train, but now and then I blow it! He downs nice, so I can stop him, but one time my husband took him out to the field and the pup thought he had been sent on an outrun and took off. By the time I got out the door he was over 1/4 mile out and across the county(dirt) road! He's got a big heart, and eagle eyes!
  7. Thanks Bill, I was just thinking about trying to contact them both, but now I may just wait and see how things go. Magazine publishing has got to be a labor of love, and a pain in the rear!
  8. Does anybody else on these boards subscribe to tne "American Border Collie", or the "Working Border Collie"? I renewed both last year and it seems like ages since I got a copy. Last month I did get the March/April issue of the "American Border Collie"(in December?)! Anybody know what's going on with them?
  9. I agree with Kelpiegirl, keep him quiet and check the leg and paw. Really look at his nails, wiggle each one gently. Sometimes a broken nail will make a dog carry his leg, it HURTS! I was always taught that in case of a broken nail, to cut it back short. Use a muzzle and have help because it will be painful. Use bloodstop to stop the bleeding, and normally the dog is just fine afterward.
  10. It's sad to say, but most Americans want instant gratification! When most people meet our BCs they are sure they want one just like Bill. I try to expain that he was not born well behaved, and that I spend a great deal of time throwing balls, working sheep, practicing obedience, and taking the dogs with me everywhere! Nobody wants to spend the time with their dogs anymore. When I have a training class, the dropout rate is twice what it was ten years ago. Some of the 4-H kids want to go to the state dog show, but they will not spend 15 minutes a day working their dog. Often the parent takes over, and then gives up if the dog is a little difficult to work with. No one wants to read up on a breed, they just decide they WANT one because they saw one on TV or in a movie, or on the street, and they're "cool".
  11. I'm far from being an expert on stockdog training, but if you worked in a small area with a few dog broke sheep, and used your body position to apply pressure, I'm sure you would both have a good time. Caution! You must make sure that you are comfortable with the sheep, so you can push through them if need be.
  12. Hi, the AKC has a pedigree service that will send you a certified pedigree for a fee. Also, magazines like Dog World have ads from folks that will research a pedigree for you, again for a fee. The AKC publishes a monthly studbook that is primarily used for research, and there may be a way to get this info through a large library. I don't know if it is on a data base or not. To use the studbook, look on your pup's registration to find a number in parenthisis after the parent's name. That number is the issue (month and year) where that parent is listed with it's sire, dam, and other info.
  13. Just another thought. Have you considered an alternate therapy, such as cold laser or chiropractic? My husband and I got our 3 year old filly back from the trainer about 4 months ago because she was lame in the rear and needed about 60 days off. We had her reshod (one rear hoof was about half an inch longer then the other), had her back adjusted, and had the sore area cold lasered. She was back to working cattle a week later with no problems. Any one of those three things , or all of them together may be responsible, we don't know. We do know that she's happy! Our good boy Bill also has his back adjusted if he has a wreck and he always seems to feel much better! Cows will kick a BC on occasion you know.
  14. It's just my opinion, but why not just try letting Repo have some time off to heal. Surgery is always an option, but he may not ever need it if you just give him time. I had an Australian Cattle Dog with a torn ACL that the vet recomended surgery for, but I opted for rest and excersise on lead for about 6 weeks. It was a pain in both our bottoms, but she healed and was sound for the rest of her life. Injury happened at about 4 years, she lived to be 14. She still ran and jumped, and worked the cattle herd with no pain and no meds. The body is designed to heal!
  15. skd, thanks for the reply. This is what I've been asking! Maybe those really good OFA hips are not the best to breed for, or at least we need to know not to eliminate an otherwise outstanding dog from the gene pool just because of his hip x-rays. Need more long term info! IMO! I've been out of town on another job, so sorry for the late reply.
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