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KrisK

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Everything posted by KrisK

  1. Congratulations to you and Daniel. There is nothing as special as working with a Therapy dog... enjoy
  2. KrisK

    Jazz

    I am so sorry to hear about Jazz. They leave us too soon... We are thinking now of a setter, whose coat was flame in the sunshine, and who, so far as we are aware, never entertained a mean or an unworthy thought. This setter is buried beneath a cherry tree, under four feet of garden loam, and at its proper season the cherry strews petals on the green lawn of his grave. Beneath a cherry tree, or an apple, or any flowering shrub is an excellent place to bury a good dog. Beneath such trees, such shrubs, he slept in the drowsy summer, or gnawed at a flavorous bone, or lifted his head to challenge some intruder. These are good places in life or in death. Yet it is a small matter, and it touches sentiment more than anything else. For if the dog be well remembered, if sometimes he leaps through your dreams actual as in life, eyes kindling, questing, asking, laughing, begging, it matters not at all where that dog sleeps at long and at last. On a hill where the wind is unrebuked, and the trees are roaring, or beside a stream he knew in puppyhood, or somewhere in the flatness of a pasture lane where most exhilarating cattle graze, it is all one to the dog, and all one to you, and nothing is gained, nothing is lost, if memory lives. But there is one best place to bury a dog. One place that is best of all. If you bury him in this spot, the secret of which you must already have, he will come to you when you call - come to you over the grim, dim frontiers of death and down the well remembered path and to your side again. And though you call a dozen living dogs to heel they shall not growl at him, or resent his coming, for he is yours and belongs there. People may scoff at you, who see no lightest blade of grass bent by his footfall, who hear no whimper pitched too fine for mere audition, people who may never really have had a dog. Smile at them, for you shall know something that is hidden from them, and which is well worth the knowing. The one best place to bury a good dog is the heart of his master. Run free Jazz...run free
  3. I have many friends with Papillons - we lovingly refer to them as the pint sized Border Collie. I am so sorry that you lost Harley. Small in stature but large in heart... "One last word of farewell, Dear Master and Mistress. Whenever you visit my grave, say to yourselves with regret but also with happiness in your hearts at the remembrance of my long happy life with you: 'here lies one who loved us and whom we loved.' No matter how deep my sleep I shall hear you, and not all the power of death can keep my spirit from wagging a grateful tail." RIP Harley, you are well loved always.
  4. As you may know, I have a very old miniature schnauzer, Zachary. At almost 18, he has a myriad of health issues. Lately, his legs have been weaker and there are times when he can't get himself back up. My DH works nights, so during the day needs to sleep. We have Zachary in an area with mats on the floor so he has more stability. Cricket and Dusty are always kenneled in the dog room at these times. On more than one occasion, Cricket has woken my DH up by "alert" barking. He will get up to find that Zachary was splayed on the floor (off the matted area) and unable to get himself up. Zach isn't barking himself, just making soft sounds. Cricket has become his guardian angel. As for Zachary, he continues to enjoy his life, although he sleeps alot more and we are dealing with incontinence issues. I don't know how much time we have left with him, but it's comforting to know that when I'm not there, Cricket is watching over him.
  5. Congratulations to you and Daniel....he would not have passed if you weren't comfortable with him! WAY TO GO
  6. That's wonderful! I know how much our residents enjoyed Jazz. He was at work with me every day until we moved to the farm. The residents loved his visits and he loved them! It is a very rewarding experience. It sounds like Daniel is a perfect dog for the job
  7. One thing I forgot - I used a large syringe to get water into Zachary because he was having such an issue trying to lap from the bowl. Also, his appetite was severely compromised because he was nauseous. I used BOOST (a human supplement) in a syringe as well. Thankfully, I didn't have to use the syringe method very long. Hope the pup feels better soon
  8. I went through this with Zachary, my miniature schnauzer. They are very, very dizzy so letting her rest is the best thing. I had to hand feed for about 4 days before he was feeling less 'tipsy'. In his case, I was able to carry him out to do his business, but was told to be sure to hold his paws so he didn't feel disconnected from the ground. It is very similar to a severe inner ear infection that affects your balance, etc. It came on suddenly as well and it was about 2 weeks before it resolved completely. He still has a head tilt. If it is only vestibular disease, while very scary to watch, the dog seems to adapt fairly well.
  9. KrisK

    Hike Home

    I'm sorry to hear about Kipmik. I found this variation of Rainbow Bridge, dedicated to Siberian Huskies, but I think it applies to any sled dog. North of The Rainbow Bridge by MakWa4me The time comes. A Siberian Husky lifts up its head. There is an untested adventure beyond. Time to go. Across the Rainbow Bridge is a place for all dogs. A river runs wide and shallow with tennis balls that fly with their own wings; that is the place for a Labrador or Golden to await its master's arrival. The Siberian is not content here. Northward is its trail.... There are soft pastures for Aussies and Border Collies, with sheep and geese to pen. Agility equipment grows like trees amid Frisbees and flyball. But the North continues its sure wild call, and the Siberian's journey continues.... Now the air is colder. Now the moon is always full. Now the light is silver and it breaks and shimmers on fields of bright snow. Now there are no roads, no walls, no pens, just endless space to run. This is where Siberians gather, North of the Rainbow Bridge. They wait in this beautiful place, happy, but not complete. Suddenly, a howl begins, as one dog senses someone coming, someone very special. All the Siberians raise their heads and join in the ancient chorus. They dance like moonbeams and sing like winter winds. There are red ones like dawn streaks, black ones splattered with many colors and silver ones like the first strange hour before light. They line up as if in harness and run together, in a scintillating, many-colored streak. The leader of the team guides the others past the fields and river, with racing feet and racing heart. They rush to greet the new arrival at the Rainbow Bridge, where the leader is rejoined with its beloved person, never to be parted again. The glory of the reunion is celebrated by all the Siberians dwelling beyond the Bridge, a glimmering, multicolored team leaping and whirling with joy. The light from that scene is what we see on magical evenings in the northernmost parts of this Earth: The Aurora Borealis, the Northern Lights beyond the Rainbow Bridge. Run swift and sure Kipmik...
  10. I am so sorry that you lost Misty. I hope you find the tribute poem that you are looking for. I found this has always brought a measure of peace. We are thinking now of a setter, whose coat was flame in the sunshine, and who, so far as we are aware, never entertained a mean or an unworthy thought. This setter is buried beneath a cherry tree, under four feet of garden loam, and at its proper season the cherry strews petals on the green lawn of his grave. Beneath a cherry tree, or an apple, or any flowering shrub is an excellent place to bury a good dog. Beneath such trees, such shrubs, he slept in the drowsy summer, or gnawed at a flavorous bone, or lifted his head to challenge some intruder. These are good places in life or in death. Yet it is a small matter, and it touches sentiment more than anything else. For if the dog be well remembered, if sometimes he leaps through your dreams actual as in life, eyes kindling, questing, asking, laughing, begging, it matters not at all where that dog sleeps at long and at last. On a hill where the wind is unrebuked, and the trees are roaring, or beside a stream he knew in puppyhood, or somewhere in the flatness of a pasture lane where most exhilarating cattle graze, it is all one to the dog, and all one to you, and nothing is gained, nothing is lost, if memory lives. But there is one best place to bury a dog. One place that is best of all. If you bury him in this spot, the secret of which you must already have, he will come to you when you call - come to you over the grim, dim frontiers of death and down the well remembered path and to your side again. And though you call a dozen living dogs to heel they shall not growl at him, or resent his coming, for he is yours and belongs there. People may scoff at you, who see no lightest blade of grass bent by his footfall, who hear no whimper pitched too fine for mere audition, people who may never really have had a dog. Smile at them, for you shall know something that is hidden from them, and which is well worth the knowing. The one best place to bury a good dog is the heart of his master.
  11. Thank you for sharing Maia's life with us. I am so sorry that you lost her. Rest easy Maia
  12. Great news about Cooper! When my old BCx ran away from my dad's place, she was on the run for 2 days. When we finally caught up with her, she had run 20 km from my dad's home. She was terrified and only came to me when I got on my hands and knees calling her. It was like she didn't know who I was. It took a lot of persuasion for her to come to me. Hopefully, Zoey will be less reluctant! Sending lots and lots of good mojo for Zoey's safe return!
  13. Just saw this today...I'll cross post on another Board...sending lots and lots of mojo that these lovely pups are found safe and sound.
  14. When Zachary stopped eating (17 1/2 miniature schnauzer), I started feeding him boiled extra lean ground beef with some vegetables. He gets this every day with some kibble. It's not a large portion - just enough to stimulate his appetite. It's kept his weight steady for over a year now.
  15. I'm very sorry to hear about Kali. It doesn't seem fair that they are with us for such a short time. May there be many woolies for Kali to work at the Bridge.
  16. For those of us who have never met June, you have given us a glimpse of her life. May her retirement be long and happy..enjoy the chair June
  17. I do know Jo personally and have always been amazed by her ability to manage dogs with issues - having a blind dog and a deaf dog requires different ways of adapting. I know for a fact she is struggling with making the right decision for Boots. She will not take it lightly, if the decision is to euthanize and I know she will have done everything in her power before that decision is made. She knows that it's not possible to save all dogs..but it doesn't make it any easier.
  18. What a delightful end to Taff's journey. Kudos to you for helping Taff get to his forever home. I am sure Taff will always remember your loving and caring.
  19. Yes, miracles do happen...having had an elderly dog go missing and finding her 2 days later much farther away than I would have expected her to travel...I would say it was a miracle that I found her. Sending mojo for Lex to return home.
  20. I was just wondering if Lex was ever found. I think about him now and then. I can't imagine not knowing what happened to one of my dogs.
  21. What an amazing woman she was...I think the world has lost a wonderful soul...but the Bridge will be rejoicing in her arrival.
  22. thanks for the tips everyone shysheperdess... thanks for your tips as well. I just want to point out, that this is a dog in a class that I'm teaching..and not my dog. Since there are 8 dogs in the class, I can't be continually supervising this owner with her dog. At last night's class, I did not see him chew on his leash at all, so he is making progress
  23. I have a person in my household manners class who has a dog (8 mth old lab x) that likes to grab/chew his leash. I have used the distraction method...here's something better which works intermittently. Does anyone have any other ideas for stopping this behaviour?
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