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AK dog doc

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About AK dog doc

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  • Birthday 01/20/1962

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    http://vetontheedge.blogspot.com
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  1. Thanks, guys! I don't know about I-rod coverage... I'll try (if Tranq isn't available, since I think he does a better job), but it'll depend on available time. We currently have a new-grad Doc, which means there's a certain amount of slack to pick up, so it's hard to say how much time I'll have. Now, everyone cross your fingers that I don't do something stupid, like get pneumonia....!
  2. I think you have to decide on a per-case basis. I think it's much worse to leave a dog loose if it will harm itself (by, say, eating things that might take it to surgery or kill it) than it would be to crate it. I also think that if you have a dog that OTHER dogs might injure (as in Julie's example with the epileptic dog), crating is smarter than taking a chance on coming home to a gruesome disaster. Of 4.5 Bc's I've had (one a BC cross, hence the 0.5) I could leave 3 out without worrying TOO much (although one day I came home and on entering my bedroom wondered how it had managed to snow
  3. Not much for bragging huh? LOL

    I can do it for you....

    She is great.

    She is beautiful.

    Shen is smart.

    Shen is funny.

    She is beautiful.

    She is a great writer.

    If I was an dog, (no, not that kind.)I would move to Alaska so she would be my vet.

    Okay, now this is how your profile should read.....

    he he he

    I do the...

  4. It's possible it's cerebellar abiotrophy (a defect of the cerebellum, which controls rate, range and force of motion). However, A) I am NOT a neurologist, but a general practitioner, and B ) without more history and/or workup, I can't even speculate as to whether or not it will get worse. If she was born like that, it may not progress at all. If it's an acquired disorder, it could - or it might be treatable and/or curable. Can you have a neurologist look at her?
  5. No - my boss is, and we can't spare us both. I met Eileen and her husband at Martin's open house (where I found moose #1 for them and a little gang of other people who had never seen a moose.) That one was browsing among the naked birch trees up on a ridge and admittedly didn't look musch like a moose from down at the house. It kind of looked like a big brown rectangle. At first the ghirl from Switzerland looked at me like I was high when I pointed it out and claimed rashly that it was in fact a moose. But eventually it moved and people could see it was browsing. From where I was standing,
  6. She's not done having it yet! She's flying up the trail all the way to Nome and the finish with my friend Lori (who owns SkyTrekking Alaska). I was able to find her two moose - three, if you count the one in the parking lot at Willow Trading Post - and Hobo Jim. We all should cross our fingers that she gets to see some good Aurora activity so her trip is complete. I'm going to TRY to do I-rod updates in the Coffee Break section - but you'll have to rely on Eileen for the accounting of her own adventures.
  7. Thanks, Julie and Ruth! @Julie: I will tell her that. Right now she thinks her name is "Raven-Raven-butt-needs-shavin'" because we had some unfortunate matting issues (her tail now looks like a comb with half the teeth missing), so she's had a lot of practice with "be-still-GOOD-dog!". Also the ever-popular "get-in-the-back-GOOD-dog!" since it's winter, which, as everyone knows, means COFFEE DRIVE-THROUGH KIOSK SEASON!!! EVERY 40 MINUTES!!! AND GIMME A BISCUIT FOR MY OXIOUS OBNOXIOUS DOG OR I'LL STAB YOU WITH MY STRAW!!! (accompanied by wild-eyed slavering). Raven is fairly certain the way
  8. This whole thread is cracking me up. I think the "whelping" thing must be a semi-common misconception; we have clients every so often who are sure that "whelping" means "some form of vocalization, regardless of species, and often indicating pain or distress." Sometimes clients come up with misnomers that they don't realize are misnomers: they want to get their dog spaded (spayed); one time their dog had a nostalgic gaze (nystagmus); their dog had leprosy (epilepsy) and Noxema (eczema); their dog is a tomb-lilly (cryptorchid). Other times they've forgotten the word and know it. I had a clie
  9. Take her in. If it's nothing, you'll rest easy. If it's something, earlier is better for treatment. If cost is a concern, ask about costs before diagnostics. Just my opinion... my medical opinion, in this case.
  10. FWIW - and speaking AS a vet - I'd rather know if there's a problem. For the most part my time is involved with doing patient and client care one-on-one, and I would not know about things that happen at the front desk unless someone tells me. I typically don't charge out my clients - that's the reception staff's job, and I usually have another case I need to get to. I also don't answer the phones very often, so unless someone mentions to me they had a bad experience or noticed a problem, I'm usually not going to know. Even if you decide to change vets, I'd let them now what the issues are.
  11. I don't get it either. It's a HUGE marketing success, really... being able to sell mixed-breed dogs for two or three times what either papered parent would go for. (Although maybe that in itself is a bit of a marketing ploy, as well, in certain hands.) Regardless, I just do not get it how everyone and their brother suddenly could charge these massive fees for what are (however nice the individual dogs may be) basically mutts. Unfortunately there is a major "ka-ching!" factor in these dogs. I had a client a few years ago who had paid over $2000 for a labradoodle. She told me during the exam
  12. Also on the sam-e, it should be given on an empty stomach and followed with food an hour later (the amino acids in the food aid in the metabolism of it, and the empty stomach increases the chances of it a) exiting the stomach before breaking down, and b ) hitting a more alkaline pH in the stomach than in a fed animal, also in the interest of having the pill exit the stomach before being broken down.) FWIW, I've had pretty good results with that protocol (although I generally use Denemarin, a combined product; Denosyl is the single-product sam-e).... my assessment of efficacy being based on
  13. A very small bit. Hormones act in tiny amounts, so it doesn't take much tissue to potentially create an issue. If the remnant is ectopic (as in, was not originally part of the ovary proper, but was instead a little nub of renegade ovarian tissue located elsewhere), it might be tough to find. If it's a little bit remaining on the ovarian stump - well, that's in a known position so there's a reasonably good chance of success there. As for the argyria, a couple of things: One, not all people appear to be equally susceptible to that effect; Two, it may have something to do with the specific pr
  14. If it's an open pyo (stump or otherwise) you absolutely can treat it with antibiotics (I'd advise systemic, personally). If you're trying to get through a trial or something like that and it's an open pyo (is showing discharge), then using AB's til you get past your trial (or lambing, or whatever event(s) you need the dog for at the moment) seems quite reasonable, so long as the dog is repsonding. If it IS in fact a pyo and not some other process, then yes, they should be looking for an ovarian remnant. You would definitely expect a recurrence in 6 months or so. Pyometra happens AFTER the
  15. Well, I have access to one such professional board. AK is not a big HW area (lowest incidence in the U.S.), so it's less of an issue for us (although I have treated 2 HW positive dogs in the last year, and another doc at our clinic has treated one.) In ALL of the above cases, the infestations occurred in dogs who were NOT on appropriate HW prevantative. One was a stray found by clients who were vacationing in AR; the other two were compliance failures. I don't have followup on all of them as not all of them are my own patients, but where I do have followup, treatment has been effective (as in,
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