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sandysfarm

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Posts posted by sandysfarm

  1. I'm with MossyOak. Doesn't matter what your pup was doing, that's not the correction. If the guy's damaged your "property" you have recourse. The way I'd treat it is, my dog coughed and gasped, you did him damage, period... and all hell would break loose. Vet check first, get notes from the vet just as to what he physically finds, then call the owner - and have a clear idea what you want to happen. In exactly your shoes as you described it, I'd want to go right back into the very next class, I'd want the guy to call for a minute of quiet and, recalling to those there what he did, apologise to you for manhandling your dog while he fully acknowledged that his was the wrong and angry way to correct any behaviour. Try imagining it was your kid if you need to, (because it sort of is). THEN I'd walk out and never come back. And since he admitted what he did publicly, I would make social media an option for myself - there's no libel involved now.

     

     

    Then when I got home, I'd make a voodoo doll of him and stick its eyeball in with a pin. Lol

  2. Is the cat lady a poster? I'm gonna go look, because I bred Persians for a while years ago and lord, those people would eat you alive without batting an eye. Lol

    I do sympathize with aria the border collie's post though, this board is extremely unified in its position and unconcerned with repetition to an extreme. Not saying that's bad, just stating a fact. I actually respect that and all the time it takes people like GentleLake to explain, explain, explain, - without being insulting. In a world where standards are constantly being torn down or dumbed down in favour of common opinion it's a huge relief to hear defenders say "no, uh uh, wrong, it's NOT this way, it's that way, no budging".

  3. I'm an evaluator for one of the big Canadian organisations. We evaluate first for adult work and then if the dog has worked entirely satisfactorily weekly for at least one year, we will re-evaluate for child therapy work, separate, longer test involving running, squealing, food-clutching kiddies. Up here it's not a thing, this training to be a therapy dog. That's because the premise is that the best dog to use is one who comes to the stressors naturally - less to wonder about as time goes on. So we do them raw, as it were and I look for comfort amongst stress, ability to recover from a scare, cowering, fear, aversion, forwardness, curiosity, sniffing, cheeriness, owner bond, dog-dog interaction on leash during unexpected encounters. These are either inherent or they're not - you want inherent because that's a safer animal. I have about a 50% decline rate. At least half of that is handler incompetence. By me, a couple of good basic puppy, then young adult classes, is more than enough to give me a good team. (Although some of those owners could go back to relearn leash and dog sense skills, geez).

  4. I'm not surprised. A little disappointed that a conversation can't just be about her comical ear set and the possibility for them to go up or down. AKC came up, I actually dismissed it since it's not relevant to how she was bred as the Australian standard is different and has no requirement of ears (which were the original topic of conversation).

    I tried. It failed. Probably won't try again since I believe in 'fool me once, shame on you, fool me twice, shame on me'.

     

     

    So, I guess it's wrong to suspect that you posted this because you're looking to better reiterate your annoyance from the first time? It's reading a bit that way from my end. Maybe I'm wrong...

  5. Jovi,

    I was also a bit disappointed that they didn't do a culture. I am willing to give them this chance to clear it up, but if it is not I will request a sterile specimen and a culture. I really believe it never ever got cleared up from the first round. The put her on the same antibiotic until this time and there was only about 5 days between the end of the antibiotic and the retest this time and she was full of red and white blood cells and some bacteria.

     

    Hopefully she is getting better. Her disposition seems a bit better, she isn't licking quite as much, and Mollie is not nearly as interested in that area of Jade as she was before the start of this antibiotic.

     

    I also will look into your suggestions of at least giving her the cranberry. I know it works pretty well in humans.

     

    Happy New Year!

     

     

     

    Better ask about everyday cranberry pills since I remember reading that they're a caustic. They won't cure either so they're as a preventative in times of good bladder health.

  6. Here they are after her being here for about an hour.

     

     

    It's kind of a lot to deal with, right? tight room, strange Xmas tree, persistent dog trying to get on her. The couple of tail wags I saw are high and quick and she looks like she's piloerect in a couple of lights. I'd say there is way too much back pressure. I'd get her out of there and most of all I'd totally correct that dog from treating her like a mouse in a box - it makes MY blood pressure go up just watching it.

  7. Hey. How do you think Border Collies chasing and harassing the chickens goes over on a working farm? How many of those open level trial dogs do you think constantly nip at their handler, or goes after the other dogs out there? Do you think those dogs have less instinct than yours? Or maybe they just magically grew out of it on their own?

     

    I'm not a novice dog owner. I didn't say anything about suppressing instinct, just not allowing a dog to be a brat.

     

    I've got a border collie about the same age as yours. Guess what she's not allowed to do? Put her teeth on human skin, but a jerk to other dogs or harass the cats. Or chase cars. She'd really like to chase cars. That's herding instinct, too! If by herding you mean prey-drive and the desire to chase and bite things, which is all you seem to be using it to mean.

     

    I've got a two year old German Shepherd/LGD mix. Guess how much he's allowed to turn that guarding instinct into acting threatening toward people? How about how often I let him turn the tending instincts roll into acting like a fence to block the cats and kids in? Or bark his fool head off all night long? Because that's all instinct, too.

     

    I've got a Rat Terrier. He actively works as a squirrel dog and at clearing barns of rodents? How often do you think I let him tree the cat, or kill our small pets? He's 8. Guess how much of a problem not letting him do those things has been to his 'career' as a hunting dog or killing rats? NONE.

     

    Or, oh wait, I know. How often do you think I let any of the dogs hump me? That's instinct. Or mark in the house? Also instinct. They're DOGS. They live with PEOPLE. They are completely capable of living by your rules and applying those instincts in the manner you tell them to and provide for them, without putting your and their own safety at risk.

     

    No one who is unwilling to channel the instinct a dog has into behaviors that aren't destructive and dangerous - ie: drawing blood on people - has any business owning any kind of dog at all. You are going to end up with a law suit and/or your dog put down when she draws blood on somebody that isn't you. That's a huge disservice to your dog and to everyone around you.

     

    Instinct is no excuse not to train or to let your dog be a rude, ill mannered BRAT. Get the dog a ball and a flirt pole. I'd say to get her on stock but if she's been allowed to run wild and apply her own rules and ideas about what is and isn't to be 'herded' and how, I doubt any person who values their stock would let her near them.

     

    You are not 'helping' your dog become better, you are ruining her.

     

    Again: My working bred puppy is younger than yours. She has not put teeth on human skin since she was 10 weeks old. She has not been allowed to chase the cats or be rude to our other dogs, ever. She has PLENTY of instinct, but she's learning how to USE IT and exercise self-control so she doesn't end up dead.

     

     

     

    Finally!

  8. My BC will work for kisses. I'm not a super touchy owner but she will worm her way into my lap and put the side of her muzzle to my lips and say " kiss, dammit !". It has to do with resource guarding though, -she 's the last dog in, was super abused, is quite bossy. Out of curiosity the other day, bored and waiting in my car, I put a piece of ho hum bread between my lips and indicated it was hers if she wanted it. She considered it for a while, then came up alongside me on the console, lined herself up pointing the same way as I was and pressed her left ear to my right cheek... while she thought. lol. Eventually, she slid her muzzle toward my lips ever so slowly. I closed my eyes, felt the bread move, warm breath and a whisper of soft muzzle.

  9. I have two 5 year old females and I agree with CMP that the girls can be timebombs if you let them. Mine never have a cross word. But there 's so much overly polite and just-slightly-stilted body language between them that you gotta know there 's a mutual pact in place. So I check how it 's doing every chance I can and separate them when I'm out.

  10. It's not just CM. Vets' offices have been very slow to adopt to anything other than physical coercion in their day to day dealings with (your) animal. This is because it's faster to have a tech table-place, gather and bear down on a frightened dog who needs a physical exam, times fifteen a day, maybe. In the back, there's often casual pushing and shoving, into cages, into baths, onto tables. If your dog hates going to the vet, does it correlate to the number of times you 've been asked to " just wait, we'll bring him right back to you "? Older, more acquiescent people often have really nervous "vetty" dogs while those who insist that the dog stays handled by them no.matter.what. often have dogs who calmy march in the front doors.

  11. I tether till I know in my soul we're ok on hard flooring. Then I block any access to broadloom or rugs. Even now I still don 't love my dogs being on broadloom; it's usually at my SIL's or MIL's house that I'm forced to deal with it. It's soft and deep and there's miles of it and god knows what it smells like, I don 't, but it mimics grass on their pads....

  12. So just now she devoured her chicken and rice. (two small chicken breasts and a human bowl full or rice and small chunks of her regular dog food.

     

    Today she has had...

     

    -1 cup of moistened dog food

    -6 square treats

    -a bowl of chicken, rice, and moistened hard food

     

    My fiance just spoon fed her the chicken and rice to make her eat....in the morning I put her at her bowl and told her to eat.

    After the chicken and rice she has been running around acting normal. What causes a dog to just suddenly hate their dry food? I'll still call the vet tomorrow and ask them about the poop but does it seem like she's being a picky eater at this point? She ate the chicken breast like it was no problem....my fiance had to feed her the mixed dog food and rice so she would actually eat it.

     

     

     

    have you checked to see if there have been any recalls on the food you're using?

  13. yeah, I'd agree with CMP here. CM has a one size fits all approach to what he calls dog rehabilitation. Lots of positive reinforcement trainers do too though, i.e. their game plan doesn't vary much dog by dog. The difference being, I think, that CM's approach is all about CM, developed by him for him and, turns out, it works well on TV - (yeah, I know). I love watching their faces when he starts telling the dog parents what's the matter and how he's fixing it - nobody can follow the patter and jargon but nobody 's gonna admit it lest he poke more fun at them with his teeth clenching and eye rolling.

    BUT, the man moves like a panther among his dogs. He's a total natural, all grace and watchfulness. He's not coming near my dogs but when he's on the screen I can't take my eyes off of him.

  14.  

    My question [emphasis added] was directed at another poster who said that we on the Boards would be offering the OP advice on finding appropriate training.

     

    I suppose it's always a good idea for anyone to be familiar with laws that are applicable to their location. Can't really disagree with that. Certainly much more useful than familiarizing themselves with laws that are applicable to a faraway location.

     

     

    I guess I misunderstood your point. I thought you were saying that because some jurisdictions (e.g., New York) can require evaluation by a behaviorist or other expert in situations like this, your suggestion to consult a behaviorist was reasonable. I therefore asked whether, by the same reasoning, the fact that some jurisdictions can require euthanasia in situations like this would mean that a suggestion to euthanize would be reasonable. But perhaps my question/comment was too convoluted. Yes, definitely, awareness of the laws that apply in the jurisdiction where one lives is a good thing, and had that been what you said, I would not have disagreed.

     

     

     

     

    maybe these side trips should be by PM. They are exhausting to weed through.

  15. I have a first night-first dog owners class speech that goes,

    "the WORST breed of dog to own if you have kids is____? ". The responses are "GSD's, Malinois, Dalmation," etc etc. To which I answer "no, nope, no". The answer is "the Golden Retriever". Can you guess why?, I say. It's because they put up with just about any idiot behaviour that their family's kids dole out. Who doesn't hug their Golden? So the people think it's good to hug their dog; kind even. Being "good with dogs" is hugging gently, I hear all the time. The kids who grew up with a crabby Beagle or their dad's hunting dogs don't hug dogs - they've learned to offer respect and space.

  16. You know, dog management is funny; we tend to run our households based on what we know currently about dogs, and not because we absorb anecdotal information very well. Then something, usually unpleasant, happens, and our skillset gets updated because of the personal experience. Years ago, and on a requested consult, I described the precautions that a brand new greyhound owner "should" be taking as he walked his hound on a public trail that he and the dog enjoyed very much. The (very nice) owner said it was all ok; he would watch the dog (sort of ). That guy had developed a whole back story about why his dog stared at dogs, puppies and even little kids - he was lonely for company and was still nervous of new people, yada yada. Until one day, same trail, LEASHED, the dog grabbed a 25 lb poodle by the neck, banged it up and down on the ground until it was dead and then tore off its ear, which he proceeded to chew. At which point, that owner had quite a bit more experience than a lot of his peers....not to put too fine a point on it.

  17. Hi everyone,

     

    I am glad to have found this forum. We have an 8 year old Golden female and after two years of pleading my case, I finally got my border collie! I had one in the past when I was much younger and not very experienced and thus had a quirky border collie named Wally ( who bore the scars of so many of my mistakes--separation anxiety being one of the,) who was my best bud for almost 16 years. So, we welcomed a tiny 6 week old puppy named Maisey this summer. I will attach a couple of pictures.

     

    Maisey is pretty high energy, which I don't mind. I am a stay at home mom and we have a big yard and lots of trails nearby. I am learning to give her some forced downtime because she doesn't like to stop! At first, I would just play with her until she dropped and I spent a summer with kids who ate cereal and a house that was a mess! LOL! Now the pup has to enter the pecking order.

     

    My two issues, which it know are pure puppy issues and everyone has them, but I would like to continue to make progress and I thing we are stalled on these two fronts (and our trainer is on vacation for 2 weeks!).

     

    She is very mouthy. I think she came to us a little too early at 6 weeks (several reasons, but too late to fix that problem now) and has poor bite inhibition. We have tried so many things and nothing is working. She is around my other dog, who does not like the biting and acts accordingly. She spent a good part of the summer with My sister in law's two dogs, too. They were more tolerant that our Golden, but still corrected her when then needed to. But, my kids are an easy target. She ripped my pants last night and another pair this morning! We yelp and ignore. She knows drop and leave it, which works when she wants to respond. Sometimes she won't even let you pet her without gnawing on your arms or hands, let alone changing and jumping up to grab clothing, if you get your face close, you may get a nip. What else can we try. I don't want to use the crate as punishment, but I suspect some of this is when she is over tired. Any thoughts on what else to try?

     

    Also, this pup, even as a 6 week old, never pooped in the house. She practically stands on her head to let us know she needs to go outside to poop! She even rings bells. But, she will pee without warning. Even if I have her out ever hour on the hour, she will still pee in between A few times a day. When I take her outside, she will pee immediately, so she knows why she's out there. We have a command, too. No problem. But we're not making progress on the time in between. I have her gated in our mudroom because I can't make her world any bigger until she makes more progress here. She is crated when I leave the house, BTW. And, I am directly supervising her about 95percent of the time when she is not crated. She doesn't walk away and sniff. She'll stand up and just go right next to me, for example. She is still young --only almost 14 weeks, but I was hoping for better progress by now ( since she has been with us for 8 weeks now) Any thoughts are appreciated!

     

     

    Thanks--wendy

     

    The first picture is the day she arrived home and the second is of Lilah, our golden and Maisey (slooowwly becoming buds)

     

     

     

    image.jpg image.jpg

     

     

    ha, very cute! I have the same picture as yours with the happy-puppy b c and my retriever yanking back her ears and averting snottily :). The text balloon would say "jebuz, get this THING away from me".

  18. Hi everyone,

     

    I am glad to have found this forum. We have an 8 year old Golden female and after two years of pleading my case, I finally got my border collie! I had one in the past when I was much younger and not very experienced and thus had a quirky border collie named Wally ( who bore the scars of so many of my mistakes--separation anxiety being one of the,) who was my best bud for almost 16 years. So, we welcomed a tiny 6 week old puppy named Maisey this summer. I will attach a couple of pictures.

     

    Maisey is pretty high energy, which I don't mind. I am a stay at home mom and we have a big yard and lots of trails nearby. I am learning to give her some forced downtime because she doesn't like to stop! At first, I would just play with her until she dropped and I spent a summer with kids who ate cereal and a house that was a mess! LOL! Now the pup has to enter the pecking order.

     

    My two issues, which it know are pure puppy issues and everyone has them, but I would like to continue to make progress and I thing we are stalled on these two fronts (and our trainer is on vacation for 2 weeks!).

     

    She is very mouthy. I think she came to us a little too early at 6 weeks (several reasons, but too late to fix that problem now) and has poor bite inhibition. We have tried so many things and nothing is working. She is around my other dog, who does not like the biting and acts accordingly. She spent a good part of the summer with My sister in law's two dogs, too. They were more tolerant that our Golden, but still corrected her when then needed to. But, my kids are an easy target. She ripped my pants last night and another pair this morning! We yelp and ignore. She knows drop and leave it, which works when she wants to respond. Sometimes she won't even let you pet her without gnawing on your arms or hands, let alone changing and jumping up to grab clothing, if you get your face close, you may get a nip. What else can we try. I don't want to use the crate as punishment, but I suspect some of this is when she is over tired. Any thoughts on what else to try?

     

    Also, this pup, even as a 6 week old, never pooped in the house. She practically stands on her head to let us know she needs to go outside to poop! She even rings bells. But, she will pee without warning. Even if I have her out ever hour on the hour, she will still pee in between A few times a day. When I take her outside, she will pee immediately, so she knows why she's out there. We have a command, too. No problem. But we're not making progress on the time in between. I have her gated in our mudroom because I can't make her world any bigger until she makes more progress here. She is crated when I leave the house, BTW. And, I am directly supervising her about 95percent of the time when she is not crated. She doesn't walk away and sniff. She'll stand up and just go right next to me, for example. She is still young --only almost 14 weeks, but I was hoping for better progress by now ( since she has been with us for 8 weeks now) Any thoughts are appreciated!

     

     

    Thanks--wendy

     

    The first picture is the day she arrived home and the second is of Lilah, our golden and Maisey (slooowwly becoming buds)

     

     

     

    image.jpg image.jpg

     

     

    ha, very cute! I have the same picture as yours with the happy-puppy b c and my retriever averting snottily :). The text balloon would say "jebuz, get this THING away from me".

  19. Me three. I super think a dog 's meal is his. I don't like anyone poking my food either. I don 't even know for sure which of my dogs would react if a stranger hassled their bowl ... maybe all of them. But meals are supervised away from too much commotion and I pick up the bowls so nobody visits their neighbour's. I have no problem with that. And yes, trading up is for toys and anything else; a whole different issue.

  20. I'm really pleased to hear this about routines I keep Mac's routines up because it seemed to be the accepted way to raise a pup, this is my first ever pup. I'm actually much happier not having a routine for the dog as such just maintain consistency with Mac. I know he expects his routines now so I'll be easing him out of them.

     

    I did swap out his milk with a 90% water milk mix I'll do that for a few days then go to water completely and we didn't have Mr. Growly pants this morning either there was no indoor treat I let him run around outside and made him work for his outdoor treat. I'd like to say it worked a treat but the pun is too much :)

     

    Generally Mac gets a few bits through the day and his main meal after ours in the evening but the vet did say dogs like most of us like a few treats or some food first thing in the morning to get everything working. I guess it makes sense after all I like breakfast. Any thoughts ?

     

    Incidentally the behaviourist is a follower of the positive reinforcement method of training so no punitive training methods at all.She also does agility and obedience with her own BC's so I'm pretty confident if I have to involve her I'll get good advice.

     

     

    I quit reading right here. My dogs all get two good meals a day: breakfast at 8 and dinner at 5 30 or so. I've always thought that feeding once a day just makes food too big a deal, encouraging anticipatory adrenalin dumps, sharking around waiting, and most annoying, dog to dog sniping about who gets too close to who while they assume bowl positions because they're all just so losing-it hungry. I 'd advise you to feed two meals because I think you 're seeing some resource guarding - he 's really hungry, he knows that's all he's getting in the morning, and you're maybe holding it out "at" him which is making him want to own it and get it away from you since you've made its value so high. So he's telling you to stay sway from it before he actually has it. That 's why he retreats with it asap. By me, that 's not a behaviour issue to correct; it's more a handler error you can fix.

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